Shifts in mating strategies help herbicide-resistant ‘superweeds’ persist

Herbicide-resistant "superweeds" change their mating strategies over time, an evolutionary shift that helps them hold onto valuable genes and outcompete other plants, according to a new study from University of Michigan researchers. The study examined the relationships between plant mating systems and herbicide resistance in the common agricultural weed morning glory. The researchers found that morning glory populations that have evolved resistance to the herbicide Roundup rely on self-fertilization more than susceptible populations do.

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Description

Herbicide-resistant "superweeds" change their mating strategies over time, an evolutionary shift that helps them hold onto valuable genes and outcompete other plants, according to a new study from University of Michigan researchers. The study examined the relationships between plant mating systems and herbicide resistance in the common agricultural weed morning glory. The researchers found that morning glory populations that have evolved resistance to the herbicide Roundup rely on self-fertilization more than susceptible populations do.

Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Keyword Herbicides, Research, Agriculture
Date Of Record Creation 2019-01-26 19:50:21
Education Level
Date Last Modified 1/26/2019 7:31
Language English
Date Record Checked: 1/26/2019 7:30 (W3C-DTF)

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