Safety in the Wind Industry

Numerous tasks in the construction, operation and maintenance of a wind turbine require strict safety guidelines and well-designed equipment. A wind technician may be required to work in a space the size of a bathroom sitting on an 80-meter tower the size of an elevator shaft 20 stories tall (though they may not have service lifts), with massive mechanical and high voltage electrical equipment filling much of the space, many miles from the closest town, at a site exposed to some of the strongest winds – and harsh weather – around. A technician may be required to inspect the front hub and blades of the turbine – from the small space inside, or, in some cases, while being suspended along the blade on the outside. And that’s just the job of the operation and maintenance technician. The construction crew had to work at the same site first, erecting the tower, turbine and rotor using some of the tallest mobile cranes in the crane industry, as well as installing underground electrical lines and access roads across harsh terrain. The foundation may require excavating a column 2 ½ stories deep, adding to safety challenges.

Date Of Record Release
Description

Numerous tasks in the construction, operation and maintenance of a wind turbine require strict safety guidelines and well-designed equipment. A wind technician may be required to work in a space the size of a bathroom sitting on an 80-meter tower the size of an elevator shaft 20 stories tall (though they may not have service lifts), with massive mechanical and high voltage electrical equipment filling much of the space, many miles from the closest town, at a site exposed to some of the strongest winds – and harsh weather – around. A technician may be required to inspect the front hub and blades of the turbine – from the small space inside, or, in some cases, while being suspended along the blade on the outside. And that’s just the job of the operation and maintenance technician. The construction crew had to work at the same site first, erecting the tower, turbine and rotor using some of the tallest mobile cranes in the crane industry, as well as installing underground electrical lines and access roads across harsh terrain. The foundation may require excavating a column 2 ½ stories deep, adding to safety challenges.

Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Keyword Wind energy, Safety
Date Of Record Creation 2019-01-26 19:50:21
Education Level
Date Last Modified 11/15/2010 13:55
Language English
Date Record Checked: 2/19/2010 0:00 (W3C-DTF)

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu