Measuring Ozone from Space Shuttle Columbia

The measurements made by the SOLSE-2 mission on the Space Shuttle Columbia demonstrated that the limb-sounding technique will work very well for monitoring ozone in next-generation satellites. Although the primary data storage for SOLSE-2 was on board Columbia and was therefore destroyed, data were sent down to Earth for about 15 minutes during each orbit, yielding about 40 percent of the data collected during the mission. That amount was more than sufficient to demonstrate that the experiment was successful. The efforts of the Columbia crew (Rick D. Husband, William C. McCool, Michael P. Anderson, David M. Brown, Kalpana Chawla, Laurel Blair Salton Clark, and Ilan Ramon) resulted in the collection of valuable scientific data that will help design future Earth-observation satellites. Tragically, the Columbia and her crew were lost during re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere on February 1, 2003.

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Description

The measurements made by the SOLSE-2 mission on the Space Shuttle Columbia demonstrated that the limb-sounding technique will work very well for monitoring ozone in next-generation satellites. Although the primary data storage for SOLSE-2 was on board Columbia and was therefore destroyed, data were sent down to Earth for about 15 minutes during each orbit, yielding about 40 percent of the data collected during the mission. That amount was more than sufficient to demonstrate that the experiment was successful. The efforts of the Columbia crew (Rick D. Husband, William C. McCool, Michael P. Anderson, David M. Brown, Kalpana Chawla, Laurel Blair Salton Clark, and Ilan Ramon) resulted in the collection of valuable scientific data that will help design future Earth-observation satellites. Tragically, the Columbia and her crew were lost during re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere on February 1, 2003.

Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Keyword NASA, Space Shuttle Columbia, Ozone
Date Of Record Creation 2019-01-26 19:50:21
Education Level
Date Last Modified 3/13/2015 11:08
Language English
Date Record Checked: 3/13/2015 10:54 (W3C-DTF)

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