» Water quality

Cooperative Institute for Research In Environmental Sciences (CIRES)

At CIRES, a partnership of NOAA and CU Boulder, hundreds of environmental scientists work to understand the dynamic Earth system, including people’s relationship with the planet. Science in Service to Society At CIRES, the Cooperative Institute for Research In Environmental Sciences, more than 800 environmental scientists work to understand the dynamic Earth system, including people’s relationship with the planet. CIRES is a partnership of NOAA and the University of Colorado Boulder, and our areas of expertise include weather and climate, changes at Earth’s poles, air quality and atmospheric chemistry, water resources, and solid Earth sciences. Our vision is to be instrumental in ensuring a sustainable future environment by advancing scientific and societal understanding of the Earth system. Mission To conduct innovative research that advances our understanding of the global, regional, and local environments and the human relationship with those environments, for the benefit of society. Read More

Technology and Environmental Decision-Making: Nonpoint Source Water Contamination

Thirsty? Turn on a faucet or twist the lid from a bottle nearly anywhere in the United States. Most of us take it for granted that water is there when we need it or want it. But will it always be? And will it be clean? What is clean? How clean is clean enough? If it’s not clean enough, then what? If we accomplish the monumental task of answering these questions to our own satisfaction, then we will have necessarily learned that the quality of our local water supplies is inextricably linked to the quality of regional and even global water supply systems—that we’re all living next to Aldo Leopold’s “Round River.” Particularly in industrialized societies, we are constantly exposed to the evidence of the interconnectedness of our human systems—evidence that is manifested daily through information technology, politics, and economic activity. And more than ever before, the global interaction and interdependence of natural systems are being studied and recognized in the scientific community. Read More

EPA Water Research

Water research conducted at EPA provides the science and tools necessary to develop sustainable solutions to 21st century water resource problems, ensuring water quality and availability in order to protect human and ecosystem health. Read More

Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (SAGE)

At the Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (SAGE), we examine the connections between natural resources, technology, policy, human health, security, and changes in the global environment. Our staff and students conduct cutting-edge research on these critical problems, and disseminate that knowledge through innovative teaching and outreach at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Read More

EPA Green Infrastructure Wizard (GIWiz)

EPA has released a new web-based tool that helps local officials and other community members consider the benefits and uses of green infrastructure. The Green Infrastructure Wizard, or GIWiz, responds to growing community interest in using green infrastructure as a means of addressing water quality and a range of other local goals. Using a self-guided format, users can find EPA tools and resources to: * Learn the basics of green infrastructure; * Explore options for financing green infrastructure; * Visualize and design rain gardens, permeable pavement, and other types of green infrastructure; * Understand how other communities are using green infrastructure to revitalize neighborhoods and enhance land use; and * Develop green infrastructure public education and outreach campaigns. Read More

Mercury in the Nation's Streams - Levels, Trends, and Implications

This report summarizes selected stream studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) since the late 1990s, while also drawing on scientific literature and datasets from other sources. Previous national mercury assessments by other agencies have focused largely on lakes. Although numerous studies of mercury in streams have been conducted at local and regional scales, recent USGS studies provide the most comprehensive, multimedia assessment of streams across the United States, and yield insights about the importance of watershed characteristics relative to mercury inputs. Information from other environments (lakes, wetlands, soil, atmosphere, glacial ice) also is summarized to help understand how mercury varies in space and time. Read More

Green Infrastructure (EPA)

Green infrastructure uses natural hydrologic features to manage water and provide environmental and community benefits. By improving the environment and preserving open space, green infrastructure supports sustainable communities. Read More

National Low Impact Development (LID) Atlas

This Low Impact Development (LID) Atlas was created for the National Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials (NEMO) Network by the Connecticut NEMO program and the California Center for Water and Land Use to highlight innovative LID practices around the country. Its goal is to encourage and educate local officials and others about low impact development practices by providing specific, local examples of their use. The 31 member programs of the National NEMO Network have compiled the projects highlighted on this site and will continue to add new projects as they become available. Each project balloon contains project specifics, a summary of the project, photos (when available) and links to more information. Read More

World Water Monitoring Challenge

World Water Monitoring Challenge is an international education and outreach program that builds public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources around the world by engaging citizens to conduct basic monitoring of their local water bodies. In 2013, a total of 184,965 visits were made by participants monitoring sites in 51 countries. We challenge you to test the quality of your waterways, share your findings, and protect our most precious resource. Read More

Cooperative Water Program

The Cooperative Water Program monitors and assesses water in every state, protectorate, and territory of the U.S. in partnership with nearly 1,600 local, State, and Tribal agencies. The mission of the USGS Cooperative Water Program is to provide reliable, impartial, and timely information needed to understand the Nation’s water resources through a program of shared efforts and funding with State, Tribal, and local partners to enable decision makers to wisely manage the Nation’s water resources. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu