» Waste minimization

Global Prospects Rooted in Soil Science

With a focus on soils science this review, poses eight urgent issues confronting humanity in coming decades: demands for food, water, nutrients, and energy; and challenges of climate change, biodiversity, “waste” reuse, and global equity. (Journal access requires subscription.) Read More

Bioreactor Landfill Cell Feasibility Study ' Reference to City of Denton Subtitle-D Permit #1590A Landfill

The City of Denton Landfill, Permit #1590A, utilizes “Dry-Tomb” techniques for disposal and promotion of municipal solid waste stabilization, as described by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) prohibition in 40 CFR. Bioreactor research suggests re-circulating leachate increases biodegradation rates and reduces long-term monitoring from fifty years to less than ten years. Current procedures that are followed at Denton’s landfill, literature review and the use of the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model, suggest that a bioreactor landfill cell is worthy of further research. Re-circulating leachate and augmenting it with additional liquid will increase biodegradation and the need to design and build a landfill gas collection system to capture methane for energy recovery uses. Read More

Planet Protectors Club for Kids

Activities to teach kids in grades K-6 about recycling and waste reduction. Read More

Environmental Protection: The Solution Resource for Managing Air, Water, Energy and Waste Issues (Waste)

News, articles, blog posts, and products related to the environmental protection and waste management. White papers require registration. Read More

Teaching Resources – Waste and Recycling

The EPA’s extensive waste and recycling resources for K-12 teachers. Read More

Biomass Cofiring: A Transition to a Low-Carbon Future

Biomass cofiring refers to the simultaneous combustion of a biomass fuel and a base fuel to produce energy, usually electrical power. The most common base fuel is coal. The most common sources of biomass fuel include low-value wood from forestry activities, crop residues, construction debris, municipal waste, storm debris, and dedicated energy crops, such as switchgrass, willow, and hybrid poplar. Most biomass feedstocks must undergo significant processing before they can be utilized for cofiring. The shape, size, and moisture-content of feedstock particles need to be adjusted to meet specifications. Read More

The National Waste Minimization Program

EPA’s Waste Minimization Program works to find ways to help individual companies reduce the amount of waste they generate. Read More

Teachers: Basic Facts About Waste

Classroom resources on waste management for grades K-12 and for teachers. The resources below include general information about waste generation and management. Basic waste reduction tips are also included, as well as information on the link between waste and climate change. Read More

A Collection of Solid Waste Resources on CD-ROM, 2008 Edition

The EPA’s Office of Solid Waste has released its Fall 2004 Edition of “A Collection of Solid Waste Resources” CD ROM. It contains more than 300 publications on hazardous and nonhazardous waste. The documents are searchable, listed alphabetically by topic, and many are in Spanish. The publications cover many topics, including reuse and recycling, buying recycled, hazardous waste management, composting, and used motor oil. The CD also includes a wide variety of educational materials for youth. Read More

Department of Toxic Substances Control: Pollution Prevention: Environmental Education

Educational resources for pollution prevention, waste minnimization, and other environmental subjects. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu