» Sustainable buildings

High Performing Buildings - Case Studies

High Performing Buildings describes measured performance of practices and technologies to promote better buildings, presenting case studies that feature integrated building design practices and improved operations and maintenance techniques. Practical solutions are presented through case studies that include measured performance data and lessons learned through the design, construction and operation of today’s best-performing buildings measured through sustainability, efficiency and whole-building performance. Read More

World Green Building Trends Smart Market Report

As sustainability and energy efficiency initiatives take hold around the world, firms are finding business value and opportunities from green building, including the opportunity for new environmentally responsible products, according to McGraw-Hill Construction’s latest SmartMarket Report in partnership with the World Green Building Council. The report, “World Green Building Trends – Business Benefits Driving New and Retrofit Market Opportunities in Over 60 Countries,” is based on a study of global green building trends and aims to discern drivers of the green building marketplace. According to the study, firms are shifting their business toward green building, with 51 percent of respondents planning more than 60 percent of their work to be green by 2015. This is a significant increase from the 28 percent that said the same for their work in 2013 and double the 13 percent in 2008. This growth is not a trend localised to one country or region. From 2012 to 2015, the number of firms anticipating that more than 60 percent of their work will be green: – More than triples in South Africa; – More than doubles in Germany, Norway and Brazil; – Grows between 33 and 68 percent in the United States, Singapore, the United Kingdom, the United Arab Emirates and Australia. The key driver to going green, according to the survey, is that now green building is a business imperative around the world. In the 2008 report, it was found that the top driver for green building was “doing the right thing.” However in 2012, business drivers such as client and market demand are the key factors influencing the market. These opportunities are mapping against expected benefits: – 76 percent report that green building lowers operating costs; – More than one third point to higher building values (38 percent), quality assurance (38 percent), and future-proofing assets (i.e. protecting against future demands) (36 percent). Global industry professionals have high expectations of the operating cost benefits of green building—19 percent believe their operating costs will decrease by 15 percent or more over the next year (51 percent believe there will be increases of 6 percent or more), and 39 percent believe they will see savings of 15 percent or more over the next five years (67 percent expect savings of 6 percent or more). The findings published in the report are drawn from a McGraw-Hill Construction survey of firms across 62 countries around the world. Firms include architects, engineers, contractors, consultants and building owners. The sample was drawn from firm members of the World Green Building Council in 62 countries, other global industry associations, and the ENR Top Lists. Of the respondents, 92 percent are members of Green Building Councils around the world. The results include a feature of nine countries with sufficient sample for statistical analysis. The study expands and contrasts against McGraw-Hill Construction’s 2008 Global Green SmartMarket Report study. Given the survey sample source, McGraw-Hill Construction compared the sample against a non-GBC member audience, which was comparable in terms of involvement in green and planned activity. Further, the US sample was consistent with McGraw-Hill Construction’s extensive analysis of the US construction market through its Dodge project data. The study was produced in partnership with United Technologies with support from the World Green Building Council and the U.S. Green Building Council. Other research association partners include the Chartered Institute of Buildings, International Federation of Consulting Engineers (Fédération Internationale Des Ingénieurs-Conseils), Association for Consultancy and Engineering, Conseil International du Bâtiment (International Council for Building), Architect’s Council of Europe, and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors. A separate survey of global manufacturing firms was also conducted. Read More

WaterSense at Work: Best Management Practices for Commercial and Institutional Facilities

WaterSense,® a voluntary partnership program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), seeks to protect the future of our nation’s water supply. By transforming the market for water-efficient products, services, and practices, WaterSense is helping to address the increasing demand on the nation’s water supplies and reduce the strain on municipal water infrastructure across the country. WaterSense labeled products are independently certified to use at least 20 percent less water and perform as well or better than standard models. In addition, WaterSense labeled new homes incorporate water-efficient products and designs, and WaterSense labeled certification programs focus on water-efficient practices by professionals. WaterSense has developed WaterSense at Work, a compilation of water-efficiency best management practices, to help commercial and institutional facility owners and managers understand and better manage their water use. WaterSense at Work is designed to provide guidance to help establish an effective facility water management program and identify projects and practices that can reduce facility water use. Read More

Greening EPA Initiative

Living Our Mission EPA implements a range of strategies to reduce the environmental impact of our facilities and operations, from building new, high-performance structures to improving the energy and water conservation of existing buildings. Read More

A post-occupancy evaluation of a green rated and conventional on-campus residence hall

Green buildings increasingly attract attention in the real estate sector, and the United States is no exception. Studies indicate that green rated buildings may bring higher rents and sales prices. One reason for this inequity is that the indoor environment of these buildings may outperform conventional buildings. The main objective of this paper is to conduct a post-occupancy evaluation (POE) to compare the indoor environment in a LEED certified, on-campus residence hall with a similar, non-green rated residence hall. Results are evaluated to determine if green buildings really outperform. The results suggest that the green rated building outperformed the conventional building in the majority of the indoor environmental aspects, but not all. These results can inform a cost-benefit analysis of green features for new construction and refurbishments. Read More

NASA Sustainability Base

Imagine a working atmosphere designed in harmony with its environment. A building immersed in natural daylight and fresh air; one constructed to LEED Platinum standards and furnished with materials that are beneficial to your health. A building so smart and intuitive it knows exactly how much energy is consumed – and adapts itself based on weather, season and work patterns. NASA’s Sustainability Base is unlike any government building ever created. Using NASA innovations originally engineered for space travel and exploration, the 50,000 square-foot, lunar-shaped Sustainability Base is simultaneously a working office space, a showcase for NASA technology and an evolving exemplar for the future of buildings. Welcome to NASA’s latest mission on Earth. Read More

Center for Sustainable Systems Factsheets

Since 2001 the University of Michigan’s Center for Sustainable Systems has developed a growing set of factsheets that cover topics including energy, water, food, waste, buildings, materials, and transportation systems. Each factsheet presents important patterns of use, life cycle impacts and sustainable solutions. They are designed to inform policymakers, business professionals, students and teachers. The factsheets are peer-reviewed and updated annually. Read More

Building Science

KEEP receives its primary funding through Focus on Energy, Wisconsin’s statewide resource for energy efficiency and renewable energy. Focus on Energy works with eligible Wisconsin residents and businesses to install cost effective energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Focus information, resources, and financial incentives help to implement projects that otherwise would not be completed, or to complete projects sooner than scheduled. Its efforts help Wisconsin residents and businesses manage rising energy costs, promote in-state economic development, protect our environment and control the state’s growing demand for electricity and natural gas Read More

EPDL: Browse Learning Resources by Special Topics

Learning resources organized by topic. Read More

Region 8: Green Building

Seventeen descriptions with photographic examples of green building Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu