» Study and teaching

National Geographic: Freshwater

Freshwater ecosystems–lakes, rivers, and the smaller ponds and streams–make up only two percent of Earth’s water resources, and only one percent remains drinkable. Learn more about the planet’s freshwater and how you can protect what’s left. Read More

Technology and Environmental Decision-Making: Nonpoint Source Water Contamination

Thirsty? Turn on a faucet or twist the lid from a bottle nearly anywhere in the United States. Most of us take it for granted that water is there when we need it or want it. But will it always be? And will it be clean? What is clean? How clean is clean enough? If it’s not clean enough, then what? If we accomplish the monumental task of answering these questions to our own satisfaction, then we will have necessarily learned that the quality of our local water supplies is inextricably linked to the quality of regional and even global water supply systems—that we’re all living next to Aldo Leopold’s “Round River.” Particularly in industrialized societies, we are constantly exposed to the evidence of the interconnectedness of our human systems—evidence that is manifested daily through information technology, politics, and economic activity. And more than ever before, the global interaction and interdependence of natural systems are being studied and recognized in the scientific community. Read More

NOAA Education Resources: Freshwater

Although NOAA is known for its work in marine habitats, the agency has resource management, stewardship, research, and monitoring responsibilities for many freshwater ecosystems. NOAA satellites monitor the water supply for the planet, mapping snow and ice fields and providing predictions of where, when, and in what volume water for drinking and agriculture will be available. River level forecasts are a key component of the agency’s mission to protect life and property as well as manage navigability of waterways. Monitoring and managing the freshwater habitats of anadramous fish like the Pacific Salmon in partnership with local agencies is another key role in freshwater environments. NOAA’s presence in the Great Lakes region of the U.S. represents one of the largest agency operations dealing with freshwater. Great Lake coastal zone issues, historic and ecosystem sanctuaries, freshwater estuaries, environmental monitoring, and fishery management research are all part of NOAA’s operations. The collections in this thematic area are designed to assist the educator in teaching concepts and processes related to freshwater environments and to increase stewardship of these important resources. Read More

Green Infrastructure (EPA)

Green infrastructure uses natural hydrologic features to manage water and provide environmental and community benefits. By improving the environment and preserving open space, green infrastructure supports sustainable communities. Read More

Water Quality Teaching Package

MSUEWQ Worked with Salish Kootenai College and the Northern Plains and Mountains Regional Water Program to Develop a water quality teaching package. The package provides materials to support a college level water quality course to enhance water science education capacity at tribal colleges. Read More

Wetlands Education

A collection of activities, curriculum guides, educational programs, teaching tools, videos, and additional resources on water and wetlands. Read More

Magnificent Ground Water Connection

A collection of resources for use in K-6 and 7-12 classrooms to teach about the water cycle, use, conservation, contamination, protection, and management. Includes resources for all regions of the US. Read More

Aquarius 2010

Marine research and educational resources on ecosystems in oceans surrounding the U.S. The site includes reports on conditions related to the gulf oil spill, photos, videos, a library of resources, news, and information on management processes. Read More

Clean Water: Teacher Resources

Video and resources for classroom instruction for attitudes that lead to actions to protect water quality. Read More

The Secret To Leisurely Landscaping . . .

Explanation of how native plants save water, time, effort, money, and natural resources. Links to a plant selector tool for choosing the right plants for the environment and purpose. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu