» Study and teaching

NOAA ESRL Information and Activities for Earth Science Students and Teachers

Learning about the atmosphere, climate, and earth sciences is critical for students, yet these topics are often complex and challenging to teach. Below are links to five different earth science subject groups that relate to the Global Monitoring Division’s research and mission. Within each subject group educators can easily access background information about the topics, student handouts, and classroom activities that can be incorporated into lesson plans. Information and activities are geared toward grades 7-12. Teachers should feel free to modify the activities to meet the needs of their students. Read More

Global Oneness Project

Our stories explore cultural, social and environmental issues with a humanistic lens. Aligned to National and Common Core standards, our lesson plans, available in both English or Spanish, offer an interdisciplinary approach to learning and facilitates the development of active, critical thinking. Read More

Tara Expeditions

Tara expeditions organizes voyages to study and understand the impact of climate change and the ecological crisis facing the world’s oceans. Tara’s scientific expeditions study three main research themes: ocean and mankind, ocean and biodiversity, and ocean and climate. Learn more here. Read More

Technology and Environmental Decision-Making: Climate Change

A subject both complex and controversial, climate change is a problem of global proportions. A Web search engine will return well over one million results for a query about “global climate change.” In spite of—or perhaps because of—this wealth of information, how people view and interpret climate change concepts varies greatly. Understanding the subject enough to understand the various perspectives on climate change is a significant challenge. However, developing this understanding is key, as climate change may be the most critical challenge facing our world today. Decisions made today will have far-reaching, long-standing effects. This module provides a multi-faceted context for understanding the issues surrounding climate change. It summarizes some of the readily available basic information, presents multiple perspectives on global climate change research and policy, and provides classroom activities that place climate change issues in a context accessible to students. The distinctive contributions of this module to the current body of instructional resources on global climate change include: A unique combination of perspectives, skills, and tools to help individuals critically evaluate climate change data and controversy; An integration of basic scientific concepts with potential solutions involving behavioral and technological change; and The inclusion of the perspectives of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and elsewhere working on the frontier of climate change research. Read More

Climate Modeling 101

For much of modern history, climate has been predictable enough to have worked its way into the very culture, industry, and infrastructure of our society. It would make little sense to support a ski industry in Colorado if not for the expectation of snow, and it would make little sense to support a vacation industry in Florida if not for the expectation of sun. Expected climate conditions are the basis for the nation’s farming, transportation, and water management practices, among many others. But Earth’s climate system is, in a word, complicated. It incorporates thousands of factors that interact in space and time around the globe and over many generations. For several decades, scientists have used the world’s most advanced computers to both simulate climate and predict future climate. Industries such as those mentioned above increasingly rely on information from these models to guide decision making–and with a changing climate, the information is more important than ever. This site is a primer on how climate models work. The information is based on expert consensus reports from the National Research Council’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. Read More

EPA Climate Change Impacts

The changing climate impacts society and ecosystems in a broad variety of ways. For example, climate change can alter rainfall, influence crop yields, affect human health, cause changes to forests and other ecosystems, and even impact our energy supply. Climate-related impacts are occurring across the country and over many sectors of our economy. Explore the impacts of climate change by region, by sector, or by state. Read More

Climate Education for K-12

This website is designed to help educators understand climate and weather concepts and to be able to incorporate the learning material from this site into their course curriculum using examples as aids for learning. It is also useful for anyone else who wants a basic understanding of weather and climate, especially in the southeastern United States. Read More

The social-psychological determinants of climate change risk perceptions: Towards a comprehensive model

This study advances a detailed social-psychological model of climate change risk perceptions by combining and integrating cognitive, experiential, and socio-cultural factors. The conceptual model is tested empirically on a national sample (N = 808) of the UK population. Results indicate that the full climate change risk perception model (CCRPM) is able to explain nearly 70% of the variance in risk perception. Gender, political party, knowledge of the causes, impacts and responses to climate change, social norms, value orientations, affect and personal experience with extreme weather were all identified as significant predictors. Experiential and socio-cultural factors explained significantly more variance in risk perception than either cognitive or socio-demographic characteristics. Results also confirm that the factor analytic structure of climate change risk perceptions can be conceptualized along two key dimensions, namely: personal and societal risk judgments and that both dimensions have different psychological antecedents. Implications for theory and public risk communication are discussed. Read More

Hurricanes are worse, but experience, gender and politics determine if you believe it

Objective measurements of storm intensity show that North Atlantic hurricanes have grown more destructive in recent decades. But coastal residents’ views on the matter depend less on scientific fact and more on their gender, belief in climate change and recent experience with hurricanes, according to a new study by researchers at Princeton University, Auburn University-Montgomery, the Louisiana State University and Texas A&M University. Read More

Yale Climate Connections Audio

Yale Climate Connections is a nonpartisan, multimedia service providing daily broadcast radio programming and original web-based reporting, commentary, and analysis on the issue of climate change, one of the greatest challenges and stories confronting modern society. Yale Climate Connections aims to help citizens and institutions understand how the changing climate is already affecting our lives. It seeks to help individuals, corporations, media, non-governmental organizations, government agencies, academics, artists, and more learn from each other about constructive “solutions” so many are undertaking to reduce climate-related risks and wasteful energy practices. Through articles, radio stories, videos, and webinars we “connect the dots” between climate change and energy, extreme weather, public health, food and water, jobs and the economy, national security, the creative arts, and religious and moral values, among other themes. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu