» Safety measures

Floods

Practical introduction on types of floods, public warnings, worker safety, and health hazards. Read More

Safety and Health Policy and Procedure Manual

College/university safety manual: 30 examples of safety manuals for college personnel. Read More

Diesel Exhaust

Diesel exhaust is a mixture of over 400 different fine particles, vapors, and toxic organic materials, that result when diesel fuel is burned. Over 40 chemicals in diesel exhaust are considered toxic air contaminants (TAC) by the State of California. Emisiones de Diesel http://www.losh.ucla.edu/losh/resources-publications/fact-sheets/diesel_espanol.pdf Read More

Creosote

Creosote is a mixture of chemicals used in a variety of products: coal tar creosote, wood creosote, coal tar, and coal tar pitch. It is produced by heating coal (coal tar creosote) or wood (wood creosote) to very high temperatures. In large quantities, creosote is highly toxic. Creosota en espanol http://www.losh.ucla.edu/losh/resources-publications/fact-sheets/creosota_espanol.pdf Read More

Anthrax

Anthrax is an infectious bacterial disease. Anthrax can infect wild and domestic animals, such as cattle, pigs, and sheep. Anthrax can also infect humans when they are exposed to anthrax-infected animals. Ántrax en espanol http://www.losh.ucla.edu/losh/resources-publications/fact-sheets/anthrax_espanol.pdf Read More

Asbestos Containing Materials

This list does not include every product/material that may contain asbestos. It is intended as a general guide to show which types of materials may contain asbestos. Read More

New FAS Tool Teaches Scientists to Engage the Public

Most scientific research goes largely unnoticed by the general public until media reports reveal major scientific breakthroughs or biosafety accidents. The most recent module in the FAS Case Studies in Dual Use Biological Research series examines the public reaction to scientific research. It is designed to increase scientists’ awareness of the general public’s perception of their research, the possible consequences, and how scientists can engage the public to address their concerns. Read More

Backgrounder on Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident

On April 26, 1986, an accident occurred at Unit 4 of the nuclear power station at Chernobyl, Ukraine, in the former USSR. The accident, caused by a sudden surge of power, destroyed the reactor and released massive amounts of radioactive material into the environment. Read More

Photo Gallery: Chernobyl, 20 Years After the Disaster

Childrens toys and gas masks litter a kindergarten classroom in Pripyat, Ukraine. The abandoned town sits just two miles (three kilometers) from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, which exploded in the predawn hours of April 26, 1986. All 50,000 Pripyat residents were evacuated after the accident, and the town, which was created for Chernobyl employees, has not been repopulated. Read More

Ban Ki-moon and Maria Sharapova Commemorate Chernobyl Tragedy

In a statement issued on the 21st anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, a spokesperson for United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called on the world to remember the pain and loss of the disaster, but at the same time expressed hope about the prospects for a return to normalcy in the affected regions. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu