» Rivers

The Nature Conservancy Global Solutions

We are optimists about Earth’s future. The Nature Conservancy envisions a world where people and nature thrive together. But today our world is at a crucial juncture. We will soon be nine billion people sharing one planet. A development boom is lifting billions out of poverty, but increasing demands for food, water and energy are stressing nature to its limits. We are trapped in a vicious cycle in which we over-exploit and degrade nature, in turn impoverishing life for people. We see another way forward – one that accounts for nature’s full value in all the decisions we make. It’s about creating a virtuous cycle, in which we take care of nature so that nature can continue to take care of us. Pursuing Global Solutions: In response to current Global Challenges, we will pursue Global Solutions at the intersection of nature’s and people’s needs. The Solutions are areas where we will develop specific strategies and link them to our place-based work at the system scale. These are the leverage points that take our work to a greater relevance beyond the acres we can conserve directly. Read More

When the river runs dry: human and ecological values of dry riverbeds

Temporary rivers and streams that naturally cease to flow and dry up can be found on every continent. Many other water courses that were once perennial now also have temporary flow regimes due to the effects of water extraction for human use or as a result of changes in land use and climate. The dry beds of these temporary rivers are an integral part of river landscapes. We discuss their importance in human culture and their unique diversity of aquatic, amphibious, and terrestrial biota. We also describe their role as seed and egg banks for aquatic biota, as dispersal corridors and temporal ecotones linking wet and dry phases, and as sites for the storage and processing of organic matter and nutrients. In light of these valuable functions, dry riverbeds need to be fully integrated into river management policies and monitoring programs. We also identify key knowledge gaps and suggest research questions concerning the values of dry riverbeds. Read More

Pesticide Trends in Major Rivers of the United States, 1992–2010

This report is part of a series of pesticide trend assessments led by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. This assessment focuses on major rivers of various sizes throughout the United States that have large watersheds with a range of land uses, changes in pesticide use, changes in management practices, and natural influences typical of the regions being drained. Read More

Transport Processes in the Environment (MIT Open Courseware)

This class serves as an introduction to mass transport in environmental flows, with emphasis given to river and lake systems. The class will cover the derivation and solutions to the differential form of mass conservation equations. Class topics to be covered will include: molecular and turbulent diffusion, boundary layers, dissolution, bed-water exchange, air-water exchange and particle transport. Read More

The Proposed Fastrill Reservoir in East Texas: A Study Using Geographic Information Systems

Geographic information systems and remote sensing software were used to analyze data to determine the area and volume of the proposed Fastrill Reservoir, and to examine seven alternatives. The controversial reservoir site is in the same location as a nascent wildlife refuge. Six general land cover types impacted by the reservoir were also quantified using Landsat imagery. The study found that water consumption in Dallas is high, but if consumption rates are reduced to that of similar Texas cities, the reservoir is likely unnecessary. The reservoir and its alternatives were modeled in a GIS by selecting sites and intersecting horizontal water surfaces with terrain data to create a series of reservoir footprints and volumetric measurements. These were then compared with a classified satellite imagery to quantify land cover types. The reservoir impacted the most ecologically sensitive land cover type the most. Only one alternative site appeared slightly less environmentally damaging. Read More

Nonpoint Source Kids Page

Six activities for understanding nonpoint source pollution. Read More

TVAkids.com

Web site on electric power generation, green energy, and protecting the environment. Read More

The Water Cycle: Streamflow

Provides an overview of the role of streams in the water cycle and discusses factors that can affect streamflow. A sub-page of the USGS’s Water Science for Schools site. Read More

USGS National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program: “About NAWQA Study Units.”

Access to 51 studies and summary reports from 1991-2001 on U.S. river basins and aquifers. Choose selected study unit from the drop-down menu. Read More

America’s Rivers: Preparing for the Future

A 28 minute video story of how community leaders around the country are solving flood problems by working with nature, not against it. Dams are being removed and levees are being set back in an effort to restore floodplains and give our rivers room to spread out, while making communities safer and more resilient to weather extremes, and restoring vital habitat for fish and wildlife. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu