» Restoration ecology

The Guide: A Biologist in Gorongosa

Growing up near Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, Tonga Torcida has dreamed of becoming a tour guide at the park. But when he meets and gets to work with ant biologist E.O. Wilson in the park, his views of the world around him—and of his future—drastically change. Torcida decides to pursue a career in science and work to ensure that the park is enjoyed by future generations. Produced by Academy Award winning filmmaker Jessica Yu, the film weaves themes in conservation biology and environmental science, the value of scientific mentorship, and the social and economic realities of wilderness restoration. The film and accompanying resources serve as a case study in ecology and conservation biology. Read More

Identifying and Improving Green Spaces on a College Campus: A Photovoice Study

Research suggests that a large percent of college students experience stress due to the demands of college life. Campus health professionals use a wide range of interventions to reduce student stress; however, the ability of green spaces on campuses to alleviate stress is often lacking in college health programs and related research. In this study, photovoice methodology was used to conduct a community-based participatory research project in order to identify and improve campus green spaces that students frequent for stress relief. Participants included 45 undergraduate students enrolled in an emotional health course. Students were instructed to take photos that addressed two open-ended questions: (1) What green spaces on campus do you visit to alleviate stress? (2) How could the green spaces on campus be improved for alleviating stress? Afterward, students analyzed and placed their photos into distinct themes. Results showed that students enjoyed green spaces that featured both man-made structures (e.g., swings, fountains, benches) and exclusively natural areas (e.g., magnolia trees, campus parks). Students indicated that campus areas in need of improvement for alleviating stress included trash cans, areas lacking landscaping, piles of cigarette butts, and a dilapidated campus tower. Spaces that helped alleviate stress and spaces that needed improvement were both reflective of Attention Restoration Theory. At the culmination of the project, the students shared their findings with the campus community at a photo exhibit. During the exhibit, students’ voices were heard by campus administrators in positions of authority (e.g., chancellor, director of Facilities Operations, grounds crew supervisor). Read More

Roadmap for Restoring Ecosystem Resiliency and Sustainability

This document describes the economic and environmental value of the gulf coast environment and plans by federal and state governments to restore and protect wetlands and barrier islands. Read More

Dead Planet, Living Planet: Biodiversity and Ecosystem Restoration for Sustainable Development

This report discusses some vital services that natural ecosystems contribute to human health and development. Read More

Evaluating Tree Seedling Survival and Growth in a Bottomland Old-field Site: Implications for Ecological Restoration

Library Holdings. In order to assess the enhancement of seedling survival and growth during drought conditions, five-hundred bare-root seedlings each of Shumard oak (Quercus shumardii Buckl.) and green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) were planted each with four soil amendments at a Wildlife Management Area in Lewisville, Texas. The treatments were a mycorrhizal inoculant, mulch fabric, and two superabsorbent gels (TerraSorb® and DRiWATER®). Survival and growth measurements were assessed periodically for two years. Research was conducted on vegetation, soil, and site history for baseline data. Both superabsorbent gels gave significant results for Shumard oak survival, and one increased green ash diameter. For overall growth, significant results were found among DRiWATER®, mycorrhizae, and mulch treatments. Read More

Habitat Protection and Restoration

As a part of the South Florida Program, NOAA has taken a lead role to rigorously investigate the causes of present changes in the Everglades/Florida Bay coastal ecosystem and quantitatively predict the consequences of upstream restoration activities upon that ecosystem. NOAA has taken a leadership role in this effort by conducting biological, chemical, and physical studies in collaboration with other oceanographic monitoring efforts in south Florida’s coastal environment. Read More

U.S. Geological Survey and the Chesapeake Bay -- The Role of Science in Environmental Restoration

The Chesapeake Bay is the Nation’s largest estuary and historically has supported one of the most productive fisheries in the world. The 64,000-square-mile watershed of the bay provides vital habitat for migratory birds using the Atlantic Flyway. In addition to supporting aquatic communities and wildlife, the bay’s watershed serves the economic and recreational needs of 15 million people. The fertile soils of the watershed support significant agricultural production. The agricultural products and other goods produced in the watershed are shipped through ports on the bay, such as Baltimore, Md., and Norfolk, Va., to the world. Read More

Reclamation Manual

To ensure all cost estimates required to support the Bureau of Reclamation’s mission are effectively prepared, reviewed, and properly used. The benefits to Reclamation include improved quality and consistency of cost estimates, the facilitation of corporate oversight for these projects to support successful project accomplishment, improved ability to maintain credibility with water and power users and other customers, and otherwise sustain Reclamation’s credibility. Read More

NRCS Conservation Programs

This Natural Resources Conservation Service site provides information on a variety of programs related to conservation, the environment, farm & ranch, forestry, grasslands, wetlands & wildlife, and watersheds. Other links are provide to supply related additional information, including financial services. Read More

Managing Your Property for Wildlife

This is an extensive site provided by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife. Twelve different wildlife habitat management plans are available to download as PDF files. Management topics include: prairie grassland, pasture/hayland, artificial nesting structures, cool season grassland, cropfield management, food plots, old fields, planting trees & shrubs, riparian habitat, urban landscape, wetland habitat, and woodland habitat. These files provide excellent information to landowners, students, and wildlife managers. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu