» Ozone

The Antarctic Ozone Hole

The Antarctic Ozone Hole is an annual springtime event above Earth’s frozen, southernmost continent. Manmade CFCs, naturally occurring Polar Stratospheric Clouds, and the return of sunlight set off incredible destruction of the protective Ozone Layer. This video presents these complicated processes with simple to understand animations. Read More

International Ozone Association

The IOA was formed in 1973 to serve as the focal point for technology transfer and developments on ozone-related issues. For this purpose, IOA has served as the central , worldwide gathering and disseminating point on ozone information, bringing together scientists, engineers, systems designers, technologists, equipment manufacturers, and end users to share their experiences and research data on ozone and other related oxygen compounds. The IOA is a not-for-profit educational association which performs its information-sharing functions through sponsorship of international symposia, seminars, publications, and the development of personal relationships among ozone specialists throughout the world. Read More

Ozone — the persistent menace: interactions with the N cycle and climate change

Tropospheric ozone is involved in a complex web of interactions with other atmospheric gases and particles, and through ecosystem interactions with the N-cycle and climate change. Ozone itself is a greenhouse gas, causing warming, and reductions in biomass and carbon sequestration caused by ozone provide a further indirect warming effect. Ozone also has cooling effects, however, for example, through impacts on aerosols and diffuse radiation. Ecosystems are both a source of ozone precursors (especially of hydrocarbons, but also nitrogen oxides), and a sink through deposition processes. The interactions with vegetation, atmospheric chemistry and aerosols are complex, and only partially understood. Levels and patterns of global exposure to ozone may change dramatically over the next 50 years, impacting global warming, air quality, global food production and ecosystem function. Read More

Measuring Ozone from Space Shuttle Columbia

The measurements made by the SOLSE-2 mission on the Space Shuttle Columbia demonstrated that the limb-sounding technique will work very well for monitoring ozone in next-generation satellites. Although the primary data storage for SOLSE-2 was on board Columbia and was therefore destroyed, data were sent down to Earth for about 15 minutes during each orbit, yielding about 40 percent of the data collected during the mission. That amount was more than sufficient to demonstrate that the experiment was successful. The efforts of the Columbia crew (Rick D. Husband, William C. McCool, Michael P. Anderson, David M. Brown, Kalpana Chawla, Laurel Blair Salton Clark, and Ilan Ramon) resulted in the collection of valuable scientific data that will help design future Earth-observation satellites. Tragically, the Columbia and her crew were lost during re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere on February 1, 2003. Read More

NASA: Ozone Hole Watch

View the latest status of the ozone layer over the Antarctic, with a focus on the ozone hole. Satellite instruments monitor the ozone layer, and we use their data to create the images that depict the amount of ozone. Read More

Air Pollution: What’s the Solution?

Air pollution curricula with real-time data projects. Air Pollution: What’s the Solution? utilizes real time data to guide students, grades 6 – 12, to discover the science behind outdoor air pollution. The project contains exciting applications of the Internet by having students access real time atmospheric data, weather data and other sources. Students will focus on the science behind air quality issues, look for relationships and trends among the data collected via real time sources, and will examine the health impact of air pollution. Read More

AURA

The Aura mission studies the Earth’s ozone, air quality, and climate. It is designed exclusively to conduct research on the composition, chemistry, and dynamics of the Earth’s atmosphere. Read More

Trends in Emissions of Ozone-Depleting Substances, Ozone Layer Recovery, and Implications for Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure.

This Synthesis and Assessment Product (SAP 2.4) focuses on the Climate models. Depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer by human-produced ozone-depleting substances has been recognized as a global environmental issue for more than three decades, and the international effort to address the issue via the United Nations Montreal Protocol marked its 20-year anniversary in 2007. Scientific understanding underpinned the Protocol at its inception and ever since. As scientific knowledge advanced and evolved, the Protocol evolved through amendment and adjustment. Policy-relevant science has documented the rise, and now the beginning decline, of the atmospheric abundances of many ozone-depleting substances in response to actions taken by the nations of the world. Projections are for a return of ozone-depleting chemicals (compounds containing chlorine and bromine) to their “pre-ozone-depletion” (pre-1980) levels by the middle of this century for the midlatitudes; the polar regions are expected to follow suit within 20 years after that. Since the 1980s, global ozone sustained a depletion of about 5 percent in the midlatitudes of both the Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere, where most of the Earth’s population resides; it is now showing signs of turning the corner towards increasing ozone. The large seasonal depletions in the polar regions are likely to continue over the next decade but are expected to subside over the next few decades. NOTE: This Synthesis and Assessment Product, described in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) Strategic Plan, was prepared in accordance with Section 515 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (Public Law 106-554) and the information quality act guidelines issued by the Department of Commerce and NOAA pursuant to Section 515 . Read More

Ozone

The amount and distribution of ozone molecules in the stratosphere varies greatly over the globe. Ozone molecules are transported around the stratosphere much as water clouds are transported in the troposphere. Therefore, scientists observing ozone fluctuations over just one spot could not know whether a change in local ozone levels meant an alteration in global ozone levels, or simply a fluctuation in the concentration over that particular spot. Satellites have given scientists the ability to overcome this problem because they provide a picture of what is happening daily over the entire Earth. Read More

Ozone

The amount and distribution of ozone molecules in the stratosphere varies greatly over the globe. Ozone molecules are transported around the stratosphere much as water clouds are transported in the troposphere. Therefore, scientists observing ozone fluctuations over just one spot could not know whether a change in local ozone levels meant an alteration in global ozone levels, or simply a fluctuation in the concentration over that particular spot. Satellites have given scientists the ability to overcome this problem because they provide a picture of what is happening daily over the entire Earth. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu