» Ozone layer depletion

The Antarctic Ozone Hole

The Antarctic Ozone Hole is an annual springtime event above Earth’s frozen, southernmost continent. Manmade CFCs, naturally occurring Polar Stratospheric Clouds, and the return of sunlight set off incredible destruction of the protective Ozone Layer. This video presents these complicated processes with simple to understand animations. Read More

Measuring Ozone from Space Shuttle Columbia

The measurements made by the SOLSE-2 mission on the Space Shuttle Columbia demonstrated that the limb-sounding technique will work very well for monitoring ozone in next-generation satellites. Although the primary data storage for SOLSE-2 was on board Columbia and was therefore destroyed, data were sent down to Earth for about 15 minutes during each orbit, yielding about 40 percent of the data collected during the mission. That amount was more than sufficient to demonstrate that the experiment was successful. The efforts of the Columbia crew (Rick D. Husband, William C. McCool, Michael P. Anderson, David M. Brown, Kalpana Chawla, Laurel Blair Salton Clark, and Ilan Ramon) resulted in the collection of valuable scientific data that will help design future Earth-observation satellites. Tragically, the Columbia and her crew were lost during re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere on February 1, 2003. Read More

NASA: Ozone Hole Watch

View the latest status of the ozone layer over the Antarctic, with a focus on the ozone hole. Satellite instruments monitor the ozone layer, and we use their data to create the images that depict the amount of ozone. Read More

Center for Sustainable Systems Teaching Resources

The Center for Sustainable Systems has created several sets of teaching resources that can be used to support education surrounding sustainability concepts. These outlines and PowerPoints were created with a post secondary education audience in mind. Read More

Ozone

The amount and distribution of ozone molecules in the stratosphere varies greatly over the globe. Ozone molecules are transported around the stratosphere much as water clouds are transported in the troposphere. Therefore, scientists observing ozone fluctuations over just one spot could not know whether a change in local ozone levels meant an alteration in global ozone levels, or simply a fluctuation in the concentration over that particular spot. Satellites have given scientists the ability to overcome this problem because they provide a picture of what is happening daily over the entire Earth. Read More

Ozone

The amount and distribution of ozone molecules in the stratosphere varies greatly over the globe. Ozone molecules are transported around the stratosphere much as water clouds are transported in the troposphere. Therefore, scientists observing ozone fluctuations over just one spot could not know whether a change in local ozone levels meant an alteration in global ozone levels, or simply a fluctuation in the concentration over that particular spot. Satellites have given scientists the ability to overcome this problem because they provide a picture of what is happening daily over the entire Earth. Read More

Anthropogenic Ozone Depletion: Status and Human Health Implications

In this USGRP Seminar, speakers answer the following questions: what is the status of the Earth’s ozone layer? Is the Montreal Protocol working? How much time will be necessary for nature to restore the ozone layer? What are the human health effects of increased ultraviolet radiation associated with depletion of the ozone layer? Who is at risk? Read More

Global Environmental Change and Human Health: Science Plan and Implementation Strategy

It is widely, often intuitively, understood that human societies and the well being and health of their populations depend on the flow of materials, services and cultural enrichment from the natural world. Nevertheless, to date there has been little formal description and study of the relationships between global environmental changes and human health, and of the ways in which social institutions and processes modulate those relationships. For several human-induced global environmental changes, particularly changes to the world’s climate system and to the ultraviolet radiation-filtering functions of the stratosphere, there has been a recent increase in research into the main health risks. But for most other global environmental changes little formal research on the risks to human health has been carried out. Indeed, among the practitioners of the various scientific disciplines engaged in studying the processes and impacts of global environmental changes – including environmental sciences, ecology, geography, economics, etc. – there has been relatively little recognition that ecosystem disruptions, species extinctions, degradation of food-producing systems, the perturbation of cycling of elements and nutrients, and the spread of cities pose risks to the well being and health of human populations. This science plan and implementation strategy proposes to address this gap in knowledge and research. Read More

Climate Change: Ozone Depletion

At low levels of Earth’s atmosphere, ozone is a pollutant with serious effects on the respiratory systems of animals, but in the upper atmosphere it plays a crucial role in preventing harmful ultraviolet radiation from reaching the Earth’s surface. This is the ozone layer. Ozone in the atmosphere affects climate because of its interaction with energy coming from the sun. This incoming energy is spread among different wavelengths of light. We can see light that is in the visible range of the spectrum, but we cannot see the others, like ultraviolet or infrared light. All the wavelengths, including visible light, have energy (and thus heat) associated with them. Read More

Ozone Depletion

Ozone is a particular gas present both in the Earth’s upper atmosphere and at ground level. There are two distinct types of ozone; the Ground-level Ozone (or “bad” ozone) and the Stratospheric Ozone (or “good” ozone layer). Español, Chinese, Deutsch, Italiano Read More

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EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

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