» Oceanography

Action Outdoors: Educational Encounters with the Sea

Action Outdoors offers educational resources and printable classroom activities for teachers on bay ecosystems. These resources can be used in the classroom or during web quests. Read More

NOAA Archived Webinars for Teachers

The National Marine Sanctuary Webinar Series provides educators with educational and scientific expertise, resources and training to support ocean and climate literacy in the classroom. This series targets formal and informal educators that are engaging students (elementary through college) in formal classroom settings, as well as members of the community in informal educational venues (e.g. after school programs, science centers, aquariums, etc.). Read More

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies undertakes world-best integrated research for sustainable use and management of coral reefs. Funded in July 2005 under the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centres of Excellence program this prestigious research centre is headquartered at James Cook University, in Townsville. The ARC Centre is a partnership of James Cook University (JCU), the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), The Australian National University (ANU), the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), The University of Queensland (UQ) and the University of Western Australia (UWA). The ARC Centre of Excellence cements Australia’s leading contribution to coral reef sciences, and fosters stronger collaborative links between the major partners and 24 other leading institutions in nine countries. According to ISI Essential Science Indicators, four of the ARC Centre’s major research partners rank in the top 20 institutions world-wide for citations for coral reef science with JCU ranking 1st (among 1644 institutions in 103 countries) (http://esi-topics.com/coralreef/inst/c1a.html). Collectively, the ARC Centre creates the world’s largest concentration of coral reef scientists. Read More

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies - YouTube

Official YouTube account of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. CoralCoE undertakes world-best research for sustainable use of coral reefs. This website contains numerous videos suitable for use in the classroom as well as informal education. Read More

NOAA Podcasts

Connect with ocean experts and explore topics from corals to coastal science with our audio and video podcasts. Read More

Changing ocean chemistry may threaten Antarctic food chain

For the first time, NSF-funded researchers at the University of California Santa Barbara have collected long-term evidence that links rising levels of carbon and changes in ocean chemistry in Antarctic waters to the inability of tiny animals, such as sea snails, to build the protective shells they need to survive. As oceans absorb carbon-dioxide from the air, it makes the water more acidic, decreasing what scientists call the pH. The research was supported by the NSF-managed U.S. Antarctic Program. Pteropods, such as sea butterflies, a type of sea snail, are among the creatures that form the base of a food chain in the Ross Sea that includes predators such as Antarctic cod, penguins, Weddell seals, and Orca whales. Changes in ocean chemistry could have serious implications on the future survival of other creatures throughout the Ross Sea. To monitor these changes, lead researcher Gretchen Hofmann and her team have been deploying automated ocean sensors around McMurdo Sound, Antarctica since 2010 giving them the longest continuous dataset on ocean pH in the region. By continuing to deploy these pH water sensors, the team hopes to gain a more complete understanding of the ocean changes and their potential effects on one of the world’s most biologically productive ecosystems, one of the planet’s few remaining marine wilderness areas. Read More

NOAA Ocean Acidification

For more than 200 years, or since the industrial revolution began, the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has increased due to the burning of fossil fuels and land use change (e.g. increased car emissions and deforestation). During this time, the pH of surface ocean waters has fallen by 0.1 pH units. The pH scale, like the Richter scale, is logarithmic, so this change represents approximately a 30 percent increase in acidity. Read More

Four new algae species discovered in Hawaii's deep waters

Scientists working with NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries announced the discovery of four new species of deep-water algae from HawaiÊ»i. Marine algae, or limu, are very important in Hawaiian culture, used in foods, ceremonies and as adornments in traditional hula. The new species of limu were collected between 200-400 feet, depths not typically known for marine algae. Read More

Creatures and Places

An educational resource created by the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, which covers the water cycle, and informative information about marine biology. Read More

Space Available - Learning from Satellites

Extensive site with nearly 100 NASA-tested classroom activities on how to study the ocean from space. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu