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Cooperative Institute for Research In Environmental Sciences (CIRES)

At CIRES, a partnership of NOAA and CU Boulder, hundreds of environmental scientists work to understand the dynamic Earth system, including people’s relationship with the planet. Science in Service to Society At CIRES, the Cooperative Institute for Research In Environmental Sciences, more than 800 environmental scientists work to understand the dynamic Earth system, including people’s relationship with the planet. CIRES is a partnership of NOAA and the University of Colorado Boulder, and our areas of expertise include weather and climate, changes at Earth’s poles, air quality and atmospheric chemistry, water resources, and solid Earth sciences. Our vision is to be instrumental in ensuring a sustainable future environment by advancing scientific and societal understanding of the Earth system. Mission To conduct innovative research that advances our understanding of the global, regional, and local environments and the human relationship with those environments, for the benefit of society. Read More

Green Infrastructure (EPA)

Green infrastructure uses natural hydrologic features to manage water and provide environmental and community benefits. By improving the environment and preserving open space, green infrastructure supports sustainable communities. Read More

Maine's Interactive Field Guide to Aquatic Invaders and Their Native Look Alikes

An online resource for Maine’s common native and invasive aquatic plants and animals. Read More

Water Channel

Videos on how people can improve their environment and economic stability while reducing the effects of climate change and other environmental and energy issues. Read More

Water Quality: Basic Information

Lakes, streams, rivers, wetlands—our nation’s waters are a national treasure. Clean water supports an incredible diversity of plant and animal life, and it is a source of drinking water and food that sustains human life. It is a valuable resource that is used for many other activities, such as boating and swimming. It is also used by industry and for agricultural purposes. For these, and many more reasons, the U.S. EPA, states, and Indian tribes, carry out programs to protect the quality of the nation’s waters. Read More

State Certification Officers for Drinking Water Laboratories

If you want to know what contaminants are in your drinking water, check your annual water quality report from your water supplier or call the water supplier directly. If you want to have additional tests on your water, EPA recommends that you use a laboratory certified by the state. Call the state certification officer or click the web link below to get a list of certified labs. Read More

Private Drinking Water Wells

EPA regulates public water systems; it does not have the authority to regulate private drinking water wells. Approximately 15 percent of Americans rely on their own private drinking water supplies, and these supplies are not subject to EPA standards, although some state and local governments do set rules to protect users of these wells. Unlike public drinking water systems serving many people, they do not have experts regularly checking the water’s source and its quality before it is sent to the tap. These households must take special precautions to ensure the protection and maintenance of their drinking water supplies Read More

Secondary Drinking Water Regulations: Guidance for Nuisance Chemicals

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established National Primary Drinking Water Regulations that set mandatory water quality standards for drinking water contaminants. These are enforceable standards called “maximum contaminant levels” or “MCLs”, which are established to protect the public against consumption of drinking water contaminants that present a risk to human health. An MCL is the maximum allowable amount of a contaminant in drinking water which is delivered to the consumer. Read More

Drinking Water Contaminants

National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWRs or primary standards) are legally enforceable standards that apply to public water systems. Primary standards protect public health by limiting the levels of contaminants in drinking water. Visit the list of regulated contaminants with links for more details. Read More

Drinking Water Quality Standards

Extensive list of primary drinking water regulations established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu