» Hurricanes

Hurricanes are worse, but experience, gender and politics determine if you believe it

Objective measurements of storm intensity show that North Atlantic hurricanes have grown more destructive in recent decades. But coastal residents’ views on the matter depend less on scientific fact and more on their gender, belief in climate change and recent experience with hurricanes, according to a new study by researchers at Princeton University, Auburn University-Montgomery, the Louisiana State University and Texas A&M University. Read More

Hurricanes (EarthLabs for Educators and Policy Makers)

The lab activities in this module were created by John McDaris of SERC and LuAnn Dahlman of TERC for the EarthLabs project. Hurricanes are life-threatening, building-flattening, property-flooding storms. They are complex natural phenomena that involve multiple interacting processes of the air, water, land, and life. Hurricanes provide intense, real-world examples for a number of physical science concepts. When a hurricane is occurring, the human connection to our planet is real and immediate: land, water, air, and life are all whirled about by these intense storms. Like scientists, students will study hurricanes in satellite imagery and visualizations, and do some hands-on experiments. They’ll also explore over 150 years of storm data to find out when and where these storms occur. If students are studying hurricanes during hurricane season, they can monitor the position and status of storms in real time. Hurricanes can serve as an exciting entry point into understanding everyday weather, or a culminating topic for an Earth system or environmental science unit. Read More

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Course 7600: Hurricane Katrina Disaster Site Worker Course.

Student guide to lessons 1-10 of the OSHA course for training Hurricane Katrina disaster workers. Read More

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Course 7600: Hurricane Katrina Disaster Site Worker Course

Instructor guide to lessons 1-10 of the OSHA course for training Hurricane Katrina disaster workers. Read More

Work Zone Safety

Hurricane Response Initiative. Research Triangle Park, NC: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences – National Institutes of Health, NIEHSCareers & TrainingHazMat Safety & TrainingClearinghouseEmergency Preparedness ResourcesHurricanes and Floods. Read More

GAO Catastrophic Disasters Report

A 147-page report to Congress summarizing the response and recovery efforts after Hurricane Katrina, identifying the changes needed to improve the nation’s readiness. Read More

Enhancing Preparedness Adoption and Compliance in the Federal Law Enforcement Community Through Financial Incentives

A 77-page thesis that concludes, research indicates that a novel federal financial incentive concept would in fact increase preparedness adoption and compliance within the federal law enforcement community consistent with its state, local, and tribal partners. Read More

Emergency Response Resources: Storm/Flood and Hurricane Response

Recommendations for relief workers and emergency responders in hurricane disaster and recovery areas. Resources include assessment tools and guidelines for air quality, carbon monoxide, cleanup hazards, confined spaces, disaster site management, electrical hazards, falls, fire, hazardous materials, health care workers, heat stress, identifying and handling human remains, motor vehicles and machine safety, musculoskeletal hazards, protective equipment and clothing, stress, tree removal/chain saws, West Nile Virus, and more. Read More

Regional Highlights from Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States

This fact sheet draws information from the Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States report that describes how climate change affects coastal areas in the United States. Read More

Climate Time Machine

Go backward and forward in time with this interactive visualization that illustrates how the Earth’s climate has changed in recent history. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu