» Forest management

Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study

The Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES) pioneered the small watershed technique as a method of studying ecosystem processes. This long-term ecological research is conducted within the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), a 3,160 hectare reserve in the White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire, owned/managed by the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station. On-site research has produced some of the most extensive and longest continuous data bases on the hydrology, biology, geology and chemistry of a forest and its associated aquatic ecosystems. Resources at Hubbard Brook The northeastern United States has a forest ecosystem that provides us with a stable water flow, pure water quality, recreational opportunities, diverse wildlife and a variety of forest products. The future of this resource depends on good management practices and a good understanding of this ecosystem. The Research The pioneering research at Hubbard Brook has its origins in expanding on our understanding of the science of water and chemical element cycles, soil microbial activity, soil chemical reactions, the effects of deforestation, and land management practices. That research has now expanded to include wildlife habitats, geology, and studies of human impacts on our environment, and assessment of potential methods of mitigating that impact. The diversity of research offers our next generation of scientists a good foundation in interdisciplinary collaboration and in sharing their scientific-based results. Read More

Linking Local Perceptions to the Biophysical and Amenity Contexts of Forest Disturbance in Colorado

Disturbances by insects have considerable effect on the heterogeneity of forested landscapes in North America. Responding to calls for bringing human dimensions of landscape disturbance and heterogeneity into ecological assessments and management strategies, this paper explores linkages between biophysical, socioeconomic, and perceptual aspects of a mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak in north central Colorado. Findings are presented from surveys conducted with residents of nine Colorado communities and variations in local perceptions of MPB risks and forest management attitudes are compared to indices of tree mortality and amenity characteristics. Findings suggest respondents from lower amenity communities with more recent emphasis on resource extraction and higher tree mortality had significantly higher risk perceptions of some MPB impacts, lower trust in federal forest management, and higher faith in forest industry and specific industry options than those from higher amenity communities with less tree mortality. While not implying these contextual influences fully explain such perceptual dimensions, this paper explores possible implications of heterogeneity across human landscapes for improving the saliency and efficiency of regional forest management and planning. Read More

Southeastern Forests and Climate Change

Project Learning Tree and the University of Florida have developed a new secondary module to help educators in the Southeast teach about climate change impacts on forest ecosystems, the role of forests in sequestering carbon, and strategies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to changing climatic conditions. The module explores these concepts in 14 experiential activities by using research related to the goals of PINEMAP—a regional research, education, and extension program focused on southern pine management and climate change. On this website, you will find the new secondary module, along with tools and resources to help you use these activities with your students. Read More

Islands on the Edge: Housing Development and Other Threats to America's Pacific and Caribbean Island Forests (2014)

This report provides an overview of expected housing density changes and related impacts to private forests on America’s islands in the Pacific and Carribbean, specifically Hawaii, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The vulnerability of island forests to conversion for housing development, introduction and spread of invasive species, and risk of uncharacteristic wildfire, among other concerns are discussed. The maps and projections suggest that in localized areas from 3 to 25 percent of private forest land is likely to experience a substantial increase in housing density from 2000 to 2030. Resource managers, developers, community leaders, and landowners should consider the impacts of housing development and invasive species on ecosystem services in coming decades. Read More

Threats to At-Risk Species in America's Private Forests: A Forests on the Edge Report

America’s private forests harbor thousands of species – from butterflies, bears, birds and bats; to salmon, snails and salamanders that inhabit streams and wetlands; to flowers, trees and shrubs that feed and protect wildlife and enrich human lives. Many native animals and plants found in private forests nationwide are at risk of decline or extinction, in part because of impacts of increasing housing development. The effects of development on at-risk species on private forests are intensified by additional impacts from fire, insects and disease. Read More

The Forester

For Tami Sabol, the forest is her office. As a Forester for Plum Creek Timber Company, she is responsible for the health of hundreds of thousands of acres of trees. Using math and science is a routine part of her work. Running time 5:10 minutes. Available by subscription. Read More

Managing the Small Forest

A guide to the basic principles of forest management, for use by small forest owners. Note: Contents: Introduction — Silviculture, growing and tending the forest — Planting trees — Planting trees — Protecting the small forest — Measuring the forest — Cutting the timber crop — Selling forest products. Read More

Managed Forest Reserves: Preserving Diversity

Old-growth forests in western Oregon grew rapidly in low densities and contained more variable tree sizes and ages than today’s young forests. Where the goal is to achieve old-growth forest structure, thinning may enable some young stands to increase growth rates and other characteristics. Read More

Response of Birds to Thinning Young Douglas-fir Forests

Due to management policies and fire, many conifer forests in western Oregon are even-aged, dense Douglas-fir stands that may limit key habitat for some animals. Effects of thinning were seen within the first year, and included decreased detection of 9 bird species and increased detection of 8 species. Read More

Importance of Wood in Headwater Streams of the Oregon Coast Range

The erosion of a steep stream channel to bedrock offers a unique opportunity to measure the rate of wood and sediment accumulation. With an adequate supply of wood, small steams can store large volumes of sediment, limiting the disturbance to downstream areas. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu