» Food supply

The New Food Fights: U.S. Public Divides Over Food Science

Food has become a flashpoint in American culture and politics. In the past generation, Americans have witnessed the introduction of genetically modified crops, the rise of the organic food industry, increasing concerns about obesity, growing awareness to food allergies and other health concerns linked with what people eat, an expanding volume of best-selling books and publications about food and the proliferation of premier chefs as superstars in popular culture. Read More

TEACHING AND LEARNING FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE Multimedia Teacher Education Programme

Close to one trillion people in the world do not have sufficient food for a healthy and active life. While much progress has been made towards food security in recent decades, without further urgent and coordinated action, poverty, hunger and malnutrition will continue to undermine the lives of hundreds of millions of people now and in years to come. The world’s population reached 6 billion people in 1999 and is expected to reach 8.5 billion by 2025, when 83% of the world will be living in the South. However, our long-term ability to meet growing demands for food often seems uncertain. Thus, one of our greatest challenges is increasing food production in a sustainable manner so that everyone can be adequately and nutritiously fed without over-exploiting the Earth’s ecosystems. This module introduces the main goals of sustainable agriculture and examines a range of sustainable farming practices and case studies. As such, it develops an understanding of how sustainable farming can both enhance food production and ensure that natural resources are managed in the best way possible for long-term sustainability. The module also provides ideas about ways in which the theme of sustainable agriculture may be integrated into the curriculum as part of the process of reorienting education towards a sustainable future. Read More

Center for Sustainable Systems Factsheets

Since 2001 the University of Michigan’s Center for Sustainable Systems has developed a growing set of factsheets that cover topics including energy, water, food, waste, buildings, materials, and transportation systems. Each factsheet presents important patterns of use, life cycle impacts and sustainable solutions. They are designed to inform policymakers, business professionals, students and teachers. The factsheets are peer-reviewed and updated annually. Read More

Teaching the Food System

A project of the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, this is free, classroom-ready curriculum. Lesson plans engage students in critical analyses of food system issues. Rich, classroom-based activities include discussions, debates, poster projects and more. Slides, handouts, vocabulary builders and other supplementary materials help educators deliver compelling lessons with minimal preparation. Background readings brief educators and students on the key issues. A story-driven film illustrates concepts from the curriculum with compelling narratives. Teaching modules suit a variety of contexts, including high school and college level courses. They can be taught in any order, either independently or as part of a series. Read More

International Food Policy Research Institute

IFPRI’s mission: to provide research-based policy solutions that sustainably reduce poverty and end hunger and malnutrition. Read More

Global Warming Impacts

To realize the urgency of global warming, it’s important to understand the ways it affects us. Sea levels are rising and glaciers are melting; record high temperatures and severe rainstorms and droughts are becoming increasingly common Read More

Global Warming Science

There is no longer any doubt in the expert scientific community that the Earth is warming—and it’s now clear that human activity has a significant part in it. UCS continues to support and communicate vital research on climate change, including the human “fingerprints” of its cause, the impending consequences, and the urgent need for realistic solutions. Read More

Global Warming 101

What is global warming? Think of a blanket, covering the Earth. When CO2 and other heat-trapping emissions are released into the air, they act like a blanket, holding heat in our atmosphere and warming the planet. Overloading our atmosphere with carbon has far-reaching effects for people all around the world—more extreme storms, more severe droughts, deadly heat waves, rising sea levels, and more acidic oceans, which can affect the very base of the food chain. Read More

Global Warming: Big Picture Solutions

Who can reduce global warming emissions? We can—together. Our individual efforts are important, but the biggest impact on climate change will come from large-scale changes—well-reasoned international policies; thoughtful, systematic efforts to reduce polluting fossil fuel energy sources and unsound land use practices; and steady progress toward a green, sustainable future. Read More

Global Warming: What You Can Do

The Earth is warming and human activity is the primary cause. Climate disruptions put our food and water supply at risk, endanger our health, jeopardize our national security, and threaten other basic human needs. Some impacts—such as record high temperatures, melting glaciers, and severe flooding and droughts—are already becoming increasingly common across the country and around the world. So far, our national leaders are failing to act quickly to reduce heat-trapping emissions. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu