» Environmental justice

Environmental Contamination and Public Health: The Kilauea Story

In the last century, sugar plantations blanketed the Hawaiian Islands from Hilo to Lihue. Today, just a single plantation remains in operation. Yet many of these plantations leave behind a hidden legacy of contaminated soil from old pesticide mixing areas. The Hawai’I Department of Health (DOH) has tracked down many of these sites in remote areas, where there are few risks to the general public. Now, for the first time, DOH has discovered an old pesticide mixing site with alarmingly high levels of soil contamination persisting in the heart of a residential community. This article describes how the site was discovered and how government agencies have mobilized to clean it up and protect the public. Read More

Indigenous Nations' Responses to Climate Change

The most promising avenues for Indigenous climate-change advocacy appear to bypass the established global system of sovereign states by asserting Native sovereignty in other areas. By not including the settler states, the Treaty of Indigenous Nations recognizes that the sovereignty of First Nations does not stem from its relationship with a federal government but is rather inherent and stems from its existence before the arrival of the colonial powers. The treaty also recognizes that the powers of Indigenous nations are not simply legally confined within the Western system of laws but are also social, economic, cultural, and spiritual. Even if the United States, Canada, and other countries are not responsive to Indigenous concerns, tribal leadership has a responsibility to safeguard the health and well-being of the tribal community by working with other Indigenous peoples, allies, and neighbors. Read More

A Decade of Tribal Environmental Health Research: Results and Impacts from EPA's Extramural Grants and Fellowship Programs

American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities have been inextricably linked to their environments for millennia. Because of their reliance on natural resources to maintain traditional diets, lifeways, customs and languages, there is a unique need for tribal-focused research to identify impacts of pollution, dietary exposure, cumulative risk and climate change as well as to inform decisions to reduce health risks in these areas. Read More

Environmental Justice: Income, Race, and Health (teaching module)

Data and case studies are presented illustrating how minority and low-income communities often bear a disproportionate share of environmental costs. The uses and limitations of economic analysis are explored, including the topics of valuing human life and health and the difference between efficiency and equity. The module addresses issues of environmental justice both in the United States and internationally. Suggestions for more equitable environmental policies are presented. The student reading consists of 24 pages which includes discussion questions, glossary, web links, references, and suggestions for additional readings. Read More

The Environmental is Political: Exploring the Geography of Environmental Justice

The dissertation is a philosophical approach to politicizing place and space, or environments broadly construed, that is motivated by three questions. How can geography be employed to analyze the spatialities of environmental justice? How do spatial concepts inform understandings of environmentalism? And, how can geography help overcome social/political philosophy’s redistribution-recognition debate in a way that accounts for the multiscalar dimensions of environmental justice? Accordingly, the dissertation’s objective is threefold. First, I develop a critical geography framework that explores the spatialities of environmental injustices as they pertain to economic marginalization across spaces of inequitable distribution, cultural subordination in places of misrecognition, and political exclusion from public places of deliberation and policy. Place and space are relationally constituted by intricate networks of social relations, cultural practices, socioecological flows, and political-economic processes, and I contend that urban and natural environments are best represented as “places-in-space.” Second, I argue that spatial frameworks and environmental discourses interlock because conceptualizations of place and space affect how environments are perceived, serve as framing devices to identify environmental issues, and entail different solutions to problems. In the midst of demonstrating how the racialization of place upholds inequitable distributions of pollution burdens, I introduce notions of “social location” and “white privilege” to account for the conflicting agendas of the mainstream environmental movement and the environmental justice movement, and consequent accusations of discriminatory environmentalism. Third, I outline a bivalent environmental justice theory that deals with the spatialities of environmental injustices. The theory synergizes distributive justice and the politics of social equality with recognition justice and the politics of identity and difference, therefore connecting cultural issues to a broader materialist analysis concerned with economic issues that extend across space. In doing so, I provide a justice framework that assesses critically the particularities of place and concurrently identifies commonalities to diverse social struggles, thus spatializing the geography of place-based political praxis. Read More

PERC - The Property and Environment Research Center

This is the entry point into the PERC website. According to PERC’s web site, the Property and Environment Research Center is the nation’s oldest and largest institute dedicated to original research that brings market principles to resolving environmental problems. PERC pioneered the approach known as free market environmentalism. Read More

Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy

The Yale Center for Environmental Law & Policy is directed toward international themes on environmental issues. Various publications are available through this web site. Read More

United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP)

UNESCAP promotes economic and social development through regional and sub-regional cooperation. Read More

Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center

State mandated organization offering assistance in Pollution Prevention. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu