» Energy industries

Defining Environmental Technologies and Services

The energy field is in a state of diversification and transition. As advances in renewable energy are developed and established, the United States will continue to depend on both traditional and renewable energy sources to meet the nation’s high energy demand. Emerging industries provide new jobs while a retiring workforce opens existing ones. Read More

Annual Energy Outlook 2016

Annual Energy Outlook 2016 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics. Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2016 (AEO2016) focus on the factors expected to shape U.S. energy markets through 2040. The projections provide a basis for examination and discussion of energy market trends and serve as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in U.S. energy policies, rules, and regulations, as well as the potential role of advanced technologies. Read More

CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE U.S. ENERGY SECTOR: REGIONAL VULNERABILITIES AND RESILIENCE SOLUTIONS

We live in a rapidly changing world. The effects of climate change— such as heat waves, rising sea levels and more severe storms— are already being felt across the United States. Our energy infrastructure is especially vulnerable to climate-related impacts, which can pose a serious threat to America’s national security, energy security, economic well-being, and quality of life. This interactive map illustrates how climate change has the potential to disrupt our nation’s energy systems. Click on the shaded regions below for a breakdown of the key climate vulnerabilities in each part of the country. Read More

Potential emissions of CO2 and methane from proved reserves of fossil fuels: An alternative analysis

Scientists have argued that no more than 275 GtC (IPCC, 2013) of the world’s reserves of fossil fuels of 746 GtC can be produced in this century if the world is to restrict anthropogenic climate change to ≤2 °C. This has raised concerns about the risk of these reserves becoming “stranded assets” and creating a dangerous “carbon bubble” with serious impacts on global financial markets, leading in turn to discussions of appropriate investor and consumer actions. However, previous studies have not always clearly distinguished between reserves and resources, nor differentiated reserves held by investor-owned and state-owned companies with the capital, infrastructure, and capacity to develop them in the short term from those held by nation-states that may or may not have such capacity. This paper analyzes the potential emissions of CO2 and methane from the proved reserves as reported by the world’s largest producers of oil, natural gas, and coal. We focus on the seventy companies and eight government-run industries that produced 63% of the world’s fossil fuels from 1750 to 2010 (Heede, 2014), and have the technological and financial capacity to develop these reserves. While any reserve analysis is subject to uncertainty, we demonstrate that production of these reported reserves will result in emissions of 440 GtC of carbon dioxide, or 160% of the remaining 275 GtC carbon budget. Of the 440 GtC total, the 42 investor-owned oil, gas, and coal companies hold reserves with potential emissions of 44 GtC (16% of the remaining carbon budget, hereafter RCB), whereas the 28 state-owned entities possess reserves of 210 GtC (76% of the RCB). This analysis suggests that what may be needed to prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference (DAI) with the climate system differs when one considers the state-owned entities vs. the investor-owned entities. For the former, there is a profound risk involved simply in the prospect of their extracting their proved reserves. For the latter, the risk arises not so much from their relatively small proved reserves, but from their on-going exploration and development of new fossil fuel resources. For preventing DAI overall, effective action must include the state-owned companies, the investor-owned companies, and governments. However, given that the majority of the world’s reserves are coal resources owned by governments with little capacity to extract them in the near term, we suggest that the more immediate urgency lies with the private sector, and that investor and consumer pressure should focus on phasing out these companies’ on-going exploration programs. Read More

World Energy Outlook

The annual World Energy Outlook (WEO) is now the world’s most authoritative source of energy market analysis and projections, providing critical analytical insights into trends in energy demand and supply and what they mean for energy security, environmental protection and economic development. The WEO projections are used by the public and private sector as a framework on which they can base their policy-making, planning and investment decisions and to identify what needs to be done to arrive at a supportable and sustainable energy future. Read More

Deploying Distributed Energy Storage: Near-term Regulatory Considerations to Maximize Benefits

Since the market for distributed energy storage is still in its infancy, there is a significant need for regulatory guidance and proactive policies to ensure a smooth integration into the existing electrical system. A report released by IREC offers independent insight on how to address these new challenges – and opportunities – in the regulatory arena. Read More

Economic Incentive Model for Sustainable Energy Use in U.S.

This research explores the potential of market forces to improve adoption of sustainable energy measures from the perspectives of three stakeholders; 1) the energy consumer, 2) the energy supplier and 3) society. Read More

Informing the Public about Low-Carbon Technologies

Communication materials used to educate members of the general public about, and elicit their preference for, low-carbon technologies and portfolios. Read More

Clean Edge: The Clean-Tech Market Authority

Clean Edge delivers an unparalleled suite of clean-energy benchmarking services including stock indexes, utility and consumer surveys, and regional leadership tracking. The firm provides companies, investors, NGOs, and governments with timely research, trending analysis, and actionable insights. Read More

Capacity, Production, and Consumption Assessment of the U.S. South Atlantic Wood Pellet Industry

The wood pellet industry has been in a growing trend worldwide. The Southern U.S. has been proposed as a good location to further develop wood pellet industries geared toward the supply of international markets.This research looks into the current status of the wood pellet industry of the region in terms of consumption of biomass, installed capacity, and production levels of wood pellets. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu