» Bioterrorism

Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science

An 18-page article offering suggestions on why and how to catalyze the civic infrastructure for an extreme health event. Read More

Bioterrorism and Disaster Preparedness

Although established initially to respond to clinicians’ questions regarding smallpox, smallpox vaccine, and adverse events following smallpox vaccination, the CIL has been expanded to provide clinicians with the same services for 8 other emergent diseases and terrorism agents (SARS, West Nile Virus, Influenza, Avian influenza, ricin, radiation, anthrax, and chlorine) Read More

Biosecurity and Disaster Preparedness

The Institute for Biosecurity at Saint Louis developed advanced degree programs to educate professionals about the history and contemporary threats of terrorism and emerging infections. Read More

Bioterrorism Threat: Strengthening Law Enforcement

The world is largely unaware of, and therefore largely unprepared for, bioterrorist attacks. Bio-weapons threaten thousands of casualties in addition to other disastrous long term consequences. Criminal networks can covertly transport lethal agents across borders and terrorists have already proven that anthrax can be fatally deployed. Read More

Ricin

Concern about the use of the toxin ricin as a terrorist weapon have surfaced following media reports of isolated findings and poisonings related to this substance. Ricin is a naturally occurring toxin that is found in castor beans. Ricin poisoning may occur from chewing and swallowing castor beans, and the toxic substance can also be obtained the waste material that remains after processing castor beans to produce castor oil. Read More

Viral Hemorrhagic Fever(s)

Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) refer to a group of illnesses that are caused by several distinct families of viruses. In general, the term “viral hemorrhagic fever” is used to describe a severe multisystem syndrome (multisystem in that multiple organ systems in the body are affected). Characteristically, the overall vascular system is damaged, and the body’s ability to regulate itself is impaired. These symptoms are often accompanied by hemorrhage (bleeding); however, the bleeding is itself rarely life-threatening. While some types of hemorrhagic fever viruses can cause relatively mild illnesses, many of these viruses cause severe, life-threatening disease. Read More

Plague

Plague is an infectious disease caused by bacteria called Yersinia pestis. These bacteria are found mainly in rodents, particularly rats, and in the fleas that feed on them. Other animals and humans usually contract the bacteria from rodent or flea bites. Read More

Bioterrorism

Bioterrorism is a form of terrorism where there is the intentional release of biological agents (bacteria, viruses, or other germs). Terrorism is the defined by the United States government as the “…unlawful use of force and violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives.” In addition to biological agents, terrorists can also utilize chemical agents and nuclear bombs. While a biological agent may injure or kill people, animals, or plants, the goal for the terrorist is to further their social and political goals. Many biological agents are found in nature; however, they can be modified by the terrorist to make them more dangerous. Some of these agents can be transmitted from person to person, and the infection may take hours or days to become apparent. Read More

Emergency Preparedness and Response: Bioterrorism

Preparing people for emerging health threats is one of CDC’s overarching goals. CDC contributes to national, state, and local efforts to prepare for and prevent public health disasters before they occur. When a disaster has occurred, CDC is prepared to respond and support national, state, and local partners in responding in order to improve public health outcomes. After response to a disaster has ended, CDC assists national, state, and local partners in the recovery and restoration of public health functions. Read More

New FAS Tool Teaches Scientists to Engage the Public

Most scientific research goes largely unnoticed by the general public until media reports reveal major scientific breakthroughs or biosafety accidents. The most recent module in the FAS Case Studies in Dual Use Biological Research series examines the public reaction to scientific research. It is designed to increase scientists’ awareness of the general public’s perception of their research, the possible consequences, and how scientists can engage the public to address their concerns. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu