» Atmospheric models

Climate Modeling 101

For much of modern history, climate has been predictable enough to have worked its way into the very culture, industry, and infrastructure of our society. It would make little sense to support a ski industry in Colorado if not for the expectation of snow, and it would make little sense to support a vacation industry in Florida if not for the expectation of sun. Expected climate conditions are the basis for the nation’s farming, transportation, and water management practices, among many others. But Earth’s climate system is, in a word, complicated. It incorporates thousands of factors that interact in space and time around the globe and over many generations. For several decades, scientists have used the world’s most advanced computers to both simulate climate and predict future climate. Industries such as those mentioned above increasingly rely on information from these models to guide decision making–and with a changing climate, the information is more important than ever. This site is a primer on how climate models work. The information is based on expert consensus reports from the National Research Council’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. Read More

Climate Literacy

A collection of PBS videos and lesson plans for a Teacher’s page about climate change. Categories include Climate System, Causes of Climate Change, Measuring and Modeling Climate, Impacts of Climate Change, and Human Responses to Climate Change. Read More

Past Global Changes (PAGES) Status Report and Implementation Plan

Library Holdings. This document summarizes progress made thus far by the Past Global Changes (PAGES) programme element of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP). The document also outlines the implementation plans for most of the Foci, Activities and Tasks currently within the PAGES remit. The plan first introduces the scope and rationale of PAGES science and explains how PAGES is organized structurally and scientifically to achieve its goals. For all of the palaeosciences relevant to IGBP goals, PAGES has sought to identify and create the organizational structures needed to support continued work and progress. Models intended to predict future environmental changes must, in order to demonstrate their effectiveness, be capable of accurately reproducing conditions known to have occurred in the past. Through the organization of coordinated national and international scientific efforts, PAGES seeks to obtain and interpret a variety of palaeoclimatic records and to provide the data essential for the validation of predictive climate models. PAGES activities include integration and intercomparison of ice, ocean and terrestrial palaeorecords and encourages the creation of consistent analytical and data-base methodologies across the palaeosciences. PAGES has already played a crucial role in the archiving, management and dissemination of palaeodata. This is fully summarized in the recently published Global Palaeoenvironmental Data Workshop Report (95-2). The growing significance of this type of activity is evidenced by the steep increase in consultation and use of the data currently in the public domain and accessible electronically, and by the growing importance of such data for model validation and intercomparison. Read More

Global Carbon Finance: A Quantitative Modelling Framework to Explore Scenarios of the Global Deal on Climate Change

According to the abstract, the purpose of this paper is to provide a quantitative research methodology for analyzing the costs of dealing with climate change. Read More

Global Change and the Earth System: A Planet under Pressure

Library Holdings. The PAGES research community works toward improving our understanding of the Earth’s changing environment. By placing current and future global changes in a long term perspective, they can be assessed relative to natural variability. Since the industrial revolution, the Earth System has become increasingly affected by human activities. Natural and human processes are woven into a complex tapestry of forcings, responses, feedbacks and consequences. Deciphering this complexity is essential as we plan for the future. Paleoenvironmental research is the only way to investigate Earth System processes that operate on timescales longer than the period of instrumental records. Read More

Environmental Variability and Climate Change

Library Holdings. The PAGES research community works toward improving our understanding of the Earth’s changing environment. By placing current and future global changes in a long term perspective, they can be assessed relative to natural variability. Since the industrial revolution, the Earth System has become increasingly affected by human activities. Natural and human processes are woven into a complex tapestry of forcings, responses, feedbacks and consequences. Deciphering this complexity is essential as we plan for the future. Paleoenvironmental research is the only way to investigate Earth System processes that operate on timescales longer than the period of instrumental records. Read More

Climate Projections Based on Emissions Scenarios for Long-Lived and Short-Lived Radiatively Active Gases and Aerosols

Library Holdings. This SAP (3.2) focuses on the Climate Projections Based on Emissions Scenarios. The influence of greenhouse gases and particle pollution on our present and future climate has been widely examined and most recently reported in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report. While both long-lived (e.g., carbon dioxide) and short-lived (e.g., soot) gases and particles affect the climate, previous projections of future climate, such as the IPCC reports, have focused largely on the long-lived gases. This U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) Synthesis and Assessment Product provides a different emphasis. The authors first examine the effect of long-lived greenhouse gases on the global climate based on updated emissions scenarios produced by another CCSP Synthesis and Assessment Product (SAP 2.1a). In these scenarios, atmospheric concentrations of the long-lived greenhouse gases leveled off, or stabilized, at predetermined levels by the end of the twenty-first century (unlike in the IPCC scenarios). However, the projected future temperature changes, based on these stabilization emissions scenarios, fall within the same range as those projected for the latest IPCC report. The authors confirm the robust future warming signature and other associated changes in the climate. Read More

Climate Models: An Assessment of Strengths and Limitations

Library Holdings. This Synthesis and Assessment Product (SAP 3.1) focuses on the Climate models. Scientists extensively use mathematical models of Earth’s climate, executed on the most powerful computers available, to examine hypotheses about past and present-day climates. Development of climate models is fully consistent with approaches being taken in many other fields of science dealing with very complex systems. These climate simulations provide a framework within which enhanced understanding of climate-relevant processes, along with improved observations, are merged into coherent projections of future climate change. This report describes the models and their ability to simulate current climate. Read More

Rise of Games and High Performance Computing for Modeling and Simulation

Library Holdings. The technical and cultural boundaries between modeling, simulation, and games are increasingly blurring, providing broader access to capabilities in modeling and simulation and further credibility to game-based applications. This resource might be applicable to climate change modeling, or population control, or extinction curves. Book about general gaming, modeling, and simulations, not specifically about ecology or energy simulations. Some emphasis on war games and simulations. Nice summary 8 pages, and good discussion of current thinking in this area, references given to the supporting publications. Read More

Stochastic Source Inversion Methodology and Optimal Sensor Network Design

n Atmospheric releases are one of the most highly effective and rapid means to impact large populations n Primary uncertainty due to unknown sources and meteorology n Our approach couples data and predictive models to provide • Backwards analyses to determine unknown source characteristics • Optimal forward predictions for consequence assessment • Dynamic reduction in uncertainty as additional data become available Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu