» Atmospheric chemistry

Our Changing Planet: The U.S. Climate Change Science Program for Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005

Library Holdings. This edition of Our Changing Planet includes a review of the key components of the Strategic Plan for the U.S. Climate Change Science Program, which was released in July 2003.The CCSP Strategic Plan was the first comprehensive update of a national plan for climate and global change research since the original strategy was issued at the inception of the U.S. Global Change Research Program.This report outlines how the CCSP is moving forward to implement the Strategic Plan during FY 2004 and FY 2005. As a significant part of this implementation, the CCSP will produce 21 scientific syntheses and assessments on a wide range of topics to support informed discussion of climate variability and change and associated issues by decision makers and the public.The first nine of these products are being developed during FY 2004 and FY 2005. The report also presents highlights of recent research supported by CCSP participating agencies on Climate Variability and Change, the Global Carbon Cycle, and other elements of the research program, and highlights of plans for FY 2004 and FY 2005. Note: This document describes the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) for FY 2004 and FY 2005. It does not express any regulatory policies of the United States or any of its agencies, or make any findings of fact that could serve as predicates for regulatory action. Agencies must comply with required statutory and regulatory processes before they could rely on any statements in this document or by the CCSP as a basis for regulatory action. Read More

Our Changing Planet: The U.S. Climate Change Science Program for Fiscal Year 2009

Library Holdings. The report describes the activities and plans of the Climate Change Science Program (CCSP), which incorporates the U.S. Global Change Research Program established under the Global Change Research Act of 1990, and the Climate Change Research Initiative that was established by the President in 2001. CCSP coordinates and integrates scientific research on climate and global change supported by 13 participating departments and agencies of the U.S. Government. The document highlights recent advances and progress supported by CCSP-participating agencies in each of the program’s research and observational elements, as called for in the Strategic Plan for the U.S. Climate Change Science Program released in July 2003, and later modified in the 2008 CCSP Revised Research Plan. The document also describes how observational and predictive capabilities are being improved and used to create tools to support decisionmaking at local, regional, and national scales to cope with environmental variability and change. Note: This document describes the U.S. Climate Change Program (CCSP) for FY 2009. It provides a summary of the achievements of the program, an analysis of the progress made, and budgetary information. It does not express any regulatory policies of the United States or any of its agencies, or make any findings of fact that could serve as predicates for regulatory action. Read More

Our Changing Planet: The U.S. Climate Change Science Program for Fiscal Year 2010

Library Holdings. This report describes the activities and plans of the Climate Change Science Program (CCSP), which incorporates the U.S. Global Change Research Program, established under the Global Change Research Act of 1990, and the Climate Change Research Initiative, established by the President in 2001. CCSP coordinates and integrates scientific research on climate and global change supported by 13 participating departments and agencies of the U.S. Government. The document describes a wide range of advances in understanding the underlying processes responsible for climate variability and change, such as advances in understanding of climate change at high latitudes. It also describes progress on understanding the ongoing and projected effects of climate change on nature and society, including the interconnected relationships between climate, forests, and wildfire. The document also describes how observational and predictive capabilities are being improved and used to create tools to support decision making at local, regional, and national scales to cope with environmental variability and change. Note: This document describes the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) for FY 2008. It provides a summary of the achievements of the program, an analysis of the progress made, and budgetary information. It thereby responds to the annual reporting requirements of the U.S. Global Change Research Act of 1990 (Section 102, P. L. 101-606). It does not express any regulatory policies of the United States or any of its agencies, or make any findings of fact that could serve as predicates for regulatory action. Agencies must comply with required statutory and regulatory processes before they could rely on any statements in this document or by the CCSP as a basis for regulatory action. Read More

Our Changing Planet: The U.S. Climate Change Science Program for Fiscal Year 2007

Library Holdings. This Fiscal Year 2007 edition of Our Changing Planet highlights recent advances supported by CCSP-participating agencies in each of the program’s research and observational elements, as called for in the Strategic Plan for the U.S. Climate Change Science Program released in July 2003. An addition to the report includes an analysis of the significant progress that CCSP has made toward its overarching goals since the release of the Strategic Plan. The document describes a wide range of new and emerging observational capabilities which, combined with the program’s analytical work, are leading to remarkable advances in understanding the underlying processes responsible for climate variability and change. It illustrates advances in U.S. modeling capabilities to represent past, present, and potential future changes in the physical and biological dimensions of the Earth system. The report also highlights progress being made to explore the uses and limitations of evolving knowledge to manage risks and opportunities related to climate variability and change. The final chapter documents the program’s numerous current activities to promote cooperation between the U.S. scientific community and its worldwide counterparts. The document also outlines how CCSP plans to continue implementation of the Strategic Plan during FY 2007. Note: This document describes the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) for FY 2007. It provides a summary of the achievements of the program, an analysis of the progress made, and budgetary information. It thereby responds to the annual reporting requirements of the U.S. Global Change Research Act of 1990 (section 102, P. L. 101-606). It does not express any regulatory policies of the United States or any of its agencies, or make any findings of fact that could serve as predicates for regulatory action. Agencies must comply with required statutory and regulatory processes before they could rely on any statements in this document or by the CCSP as a basis for regulatory action. Read More

Our Changing Planet: The U.S. Climate Change Science Program for Fiscal Year 2006

Library Holdings. This FY 2006 edition of Our Changing Planet highlights recent advances supported by CCSP participating agencies in each of the program’s research and observational elements, as called for in the Strategic Plan for the U.S. Climate Change Science Program released in July 2003. It describes a wide range of new and emerging observational capabilities which, combined with the program’s other analytical work, are leading to remarkable advances in understanding the underlying processes responsible for climate variability and change. The document illustrates advances in U.S. modeling capabilities to represent past, present, and potential future changes in the physical and biological dimensions of the Earth system. The report also highlights progress being made to explore the uses and limitations of evolving knowledge to manage risks and opportunities related to climate variability and change.The final chapter documents the program’s numerous current activities to promote cooperation between the U.S. scientific community and its worldwide counterparts. The document also outlines how CCSP plans to continue implementation of the CCSP Strategic Plan during FY 2006. Note: This document describes the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) for FY 2006. It provides a summary of the achievements of the program, an analysis of the progress made, and budgetary information. It thereby responds to the annual reporting requirements of the U.S. Global Change Research Act of 1990 (section 102, P. L. 101-606). It does not express any regulatory policies of the United States or any of its agencies, or make any findings of fact that could serve as predicates for regulatory action. Agencies must comply with required statutory and regulatory processes before they could rely on any statements in this document or by the CCSP as a basis for regulatory action. Read More

Our Changing Planet: The FY 2002 U.S. Global Change Research Program

Library Holdings. This document, which is produced annually, describes the activities and plans of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which was established in 1989 and authorized by Congress in the Global Change Research Act of 1990. Strong bipartisan support for this inter-agency program has resulted in more than a decade’s worth of scientific accomplishment. “Because there is considerable uncertainty in current understanding of how the climate system varies naturally and reacts to emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols, current estimates of the magnitude of future warming should be regarded as tentative and subject to future adjustments (either upward or downward). Reducing the wide range of uncertainty inherent in current model predictions of global climate change will require major advances in understanding and modeling of both (1) the factors that determine atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and (2) the so-called ‘feedbacks’ that determine the sensitivity of the climate system to a prescribed increase in greenhouse gases. There is also a pressing need for a global system designed for monitoring climate. Climate projections will always be far from perfect. Confidence limits and probabilistic information, with their basis, should always be considered as an integral part of the information that climate scientists provide to policy- and decision-makers. Without them, the IPCC SPM [Summary for Policymakers] could give the impression that the science of global warming is ‘settled,’ even though many uncertainties still remain. The emission scenarios used by the IPCC provide a good example. Human dimensions will almost certainly alter emissions over the next century. Because we cannot predict either the course of human populations, technology, or societal transitions with any clarity, the actual greenhouse gas emissions could either be greater or less than the IPCC scenarios. Without an understanding of the sources and degree of uncertainty, decision makers could fail to define the best ways to deal with the serious issue of global warming. Read More

Ocean Biogeochemistry and Global Change

Library Holdings. From the perspective of terrestrial ecosystems, the most important component of global change over the next three or four decades will likely be land-use/cover change. It is driven largely by the need to feed the expanding human population, expected to increase by almost one billion (109) people per decade for the next three decades at least. Much of this increase will occur in developing countries in the low-latitude regions of the world. To meet the associated food demand, crop yields will need to increase, consistently, by over 2% every year through this period. Despite advances in technology, increasing food production must lead to intensification of agriculture in areas which are already cropped, and conversion of forests and grasslands into cropping systems. Much of the latter will occur in semi-arid regions and on lands which are marginally suitable for cultivation, increasing the risk of soil erosion, accelerated water use, and further land degradation. Read More

NOAA Reports Potent Greenhouse Gas Levels Off

This document provides a summary of a study by NOAA researchers and National Institute for Space Research in the Netherlands. According to the study, one of the atmosphere’s most potent greenhouse gases, methane, may now have leveled off. Scientists aren’t sure yet if this “leveling off” is just a temporary pause in two centuries of increase or a new state of equilibrium. Read More

Atmospheric Ammonia: Sources and Fate. A Review of Ongoing Federal Research and Future Needs

Library Holdings. This report provides a brief summary of the state of the current state of federal scientific research related to atmospheric ammonia, based on discussions from an October, 1999 meeting of the Air Quality Research Subcommittee of CENR. Read More

Law of the People's Republic of China on the Prevention and Control of Atmospheric Pollution

This Law is formulated for the purpose of preventing and controlling atmospheric pollution, protecting and improving the environment for a healthy society and ecology, and promoting the development of a sustainable economy and society. Read More

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