» Visual/Slides/Film

Climate Modeling 101

For much of modern history, climate has been predictable enough to have worked its way into the very culture, industry, and infrastructure of our society. It would make little sense to support a ski industry in Colorado if not for the expectation of snow, and it would make little sense to support a vacation industry in Florida if not for the expectation of sun. Expected climate conditions are the basis for the nation’s farming, transportation, and water management practices, among many others. But Earth’s climate system is, in a word, complicated. It incorporates thousands of factors that interact in space and time around the globe and over many generations. For several decades, scientists have used the world’s most advanced computers to both simulate climate and predict future climate. Industries such as those mentioned above increasingly rely on information from these models to guide decision making–and with a changing climate, the information is more important than ever. This site is a primer on how climate models work. The information is based on expert consensus reports from the National Research Council’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. Read More

Exploring Ecosystems

Exploring Ecosystems is an educational video series that engages learners in problem solving scenarios as they investigate diverse ecosystems around the globe. Read More

NOAA Archived Webinars for Teachers

The National Marine Sanctuary Webinar Series provides educators with educational and scientific expertise, resources and training to support ocean and climate literacy in the classroom. This series targets formal and informal educators that are engaging students (elementary through college) in formal classroom settings, as well as members of the community in informal educational venues (e.g. after school programs, science centers, aquariums, etc.). Read More

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies - YouTube

Official YouTube account of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. CoralCoE undertakes world-best research for sustainable use of coral reefs. This website contains numerous videos suitable for use in the classroom as well as informal education. Read More

The Story of Stuff

From a Movie to a Movement We have a problem with Stuff. We use too much, too much of it is toxic and we don’t share it very well. But that’s not the way things have to be. Together, we can build a society based on better not more, sharing not selfishness, community not division. The Story of Stuff Project’s journey began with a 20-minute online movie about the way we make, use and throw away all the Stuff in our lives. Five years and 40 million views later, we’re a Community of more than a million changemakers worldwide, working to build a more healthy and just planet. We invite you to watch and share our movies, participate in our study programs and join our campaigns. Read More

HHMI BioInteractive YouTube Channel

Science comes alive in HHMI BioInteractive short films. From seeing the first microbes to uncovering fossil evidence of human evolution, make science exciting for your students through these stories of discovery! Made for the classroom, HHMI BioInteractive videos and short films are key supplements to lesson plans at all levels. From biology to genetics to environmental science, these videos bring today’s latest findings from the top scientists in their fields. Read More

ECO MEDIA: Fish and People

Pre-colonial Pacific Island societies by and large existed at human population densities that were far below the carrying capacity of their coastal fisheries and pressure from commercial fishing was non-existent. As a consequence island communities did not ‘encounter the limits’ of their coastal subsistence fisheries. People went about their daily lives harvesting from the sea and blissfully unaware that fish and marine invertebrate populations could be overfished to the point of collapse. Now that human populations are growing almost exponentially and export markets for some fisheries are intensifying, there is an urgent need for the effective communication of a scientific understanding of the limits to fisheries and the life cycles of marine organisms overall. Fish and People is a 50 minute production divided into 5 educational modules explaining the ‘stock-recruitment relationship’ in an easily accessible manner and with a cleverly crafted portfolio of explanatory graphics and natural history vision. It deals with species that are of economic and ecological importance and thus immediately familiar to a Pacific (and broader) audience. The modules are tailored for middle and upper high school students and wider communities and are accompanied by a comprehensive teacher’s guide. By empowering a critical mass of young adults with a clear understanding of how overfishing destroys fisheries and food security, they will potentially innovate their own, ‘bottom-up’ fisheries management strategies as they assume positions of influence within the community, as well as gaining a greater understanding of the need for compliance with ‘top-down’ management approaches such as size limits, gear restrictions, trade agreements and quotas. Fish and People has been scripted by marine biologists Simon Foale and Russell Kelley, and produced by The Eco Media Production Group. Read More

Aerial surveys of the northern Great Barrier Reef during the 2016 coral bleaching event

This footage shows extensive coral bleaching (white/yellow patches) on the northern Great Barrier Reef as seen from the helicopter during scientific aerial surveys in March 2016. On 29th March 2016, aerial surveys of more than 500 coral reefs from Cairns to Papua New Guinea revealed that the most pristine section of the Great Barrier Reef experienced the worst mass bleaching event in its history, with the overwhelming majority of reefs being ranked in the most severe bleaching category. The surveys were conducted by Prof Terry Hughes from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, convener of the National Coral Bleaching Taskforce, and James Kerry, project manager of the taskforce. Footage is free to use for editorial purposes but MUST be credited ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies / James Kerry. Read More

Nature - classroom (PBS)

As one of the most watched documentary film series on public television, NATURE delivers the best in original natural history films to audiences nationwide. Celebrating its 34th Season in Fall 2015, NATURE is a production of THIRTEEN in association with WNET New York Public Media, the parent company of THIRTEEN and WLIW21, New York’s public television stations and operator of NJTV. For nearly 50 years, WNET has been producing and broadcasting national and local documentaries and other programs for the New York community. Over the years, NATURE has brought the beauty and wonder of the natural world into American homes, becoming in the process the benchmark of natural history programs on American television. The series has won more than 700 honors from the television industry, the international wildlife film community, parent groups, and environmental organizations – including 16 Emmy Awards, three Peabody Awards, and the first honor ever given to a program by the Sierra Club. NATURE Online is the award-winning Web companion to the broadcast series and is spearheading NATURE’s distribution to new media platforms. Visitors can stream full episodes of NATURE programs, watch behind-the-scenes video exclusives with filmmakers and producers, view program excerpts (also available on YouTube), and find fun interactives and online features. Read More

NOVA Education Webinars

NOVA Education Webinars for teachers. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu