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NOAA: How does overfishing threaten coral reefs?

Coral reef ecosystems support important commercial, recreational, and subsistence fishery resources in the U.S and its territories. Fishing also plays a central social and cultural role in many island and coastal communities, where it is often a critical source of food and income. The impacts from unsustainable fishing on coral reef areas can lead to the depletion of key reef species in many locations. Such losses often have a ripple effect, not just on the coral reef ecosystems themselves, but also on the local economies that depend on them. Additionally, certain types of fishing gear can inflict serious physical damage to coral reefs, seagrass beds, and other important marine habitats. Coral reef fisheries, though often relatively small in scale, may have disproportionately large impacts on the ecosystem if conducted unsustainably. Rapid human population growth, increased demand, use of more efficient fishery technologies, and inadequate management and enforcement have led to the depletion of key reef species and habitat damage in many locations. Read More

The Raptor Resource Project

Bird of Prey Monitoring and Management The Raptor Resource Project monitors over 50 bird of prey nest sites in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Colorado. Our season runs from March through July and includes monitoring nest sites, banding birds, responding to emergencies, and reporting on bird populations. We also provide consultation, training, and resources for businesses that want to begin or enhance a bird of prey program. Birds of prey captivate watchers, provide wonderful organic pigeon control, and can be an important part of grassland and woodland restoration projects. Bird Cams The Raptor Resource Project manages 14 birdcams at present. While we are best known for our Decorah Eaglecam, we also have more eagle cams, multiple peregrine falcon cams, and a kestrel cam. We work with our partners to identify potential cam sites and deploy appropriate streaming technology. By giving ordinary people intimate access to the lives of wild animals, our work deepens the connection between people and the natural world, bringing benefits to both. Read More

Explore

Explore’s growing library consists of more than 250 original films and 30,000 photographs from around the world. We showcase our work at film festivals, on over 100 public broadcast and cable channels, and on numerous online destinations including explore.org, Snag Films, Hulu and TakePart. “At explore we are archivists,” explains founder Charles Annenberg Weingarten. “We strive to create films that allow the viewer to join us on our journey as we go on location and experience what unfolds. It’s like the viewers are traveling with the team.” explore features a wide range of topics—from animal rights, health and human services, and poverty to the environment, education, and spirituality. Delivered in short, digestible bites, explore films appeal to viewers of all ages, from children learning about other cultures for the first time to adults looking for a fresh perspective on the world around them. explore films include: a woman in Mumbai who has dedicated her life to rescuing young women from prostitution, a priest in Los Angeles who helps gang members reintegrate into society, a project to protect wild mountain gorillas in Rwanda, and an environmental university in Costa Rica that focuses on sustainable development. Individuals and organizations featured in many explore films also receive explore funding in the form of Annenberg Foundation grants. To date, over $15 million has been awarded to more than 100 non-profit organizations worldwide. explore.org, the online portal for explore, is a community destination where people share thoughts, engage in dialogue, view and email films and photographs, and embed their favorites on blogs and social networking sites. Never stop learning™. Come explore. Read More

U.S. Energy Facts - Explained (EIA)

A U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) site, that utilizes a mix of text and current graphic data to help to explain the science of energy. The basic units of measure, types of energy utilized, and production changes over time, are all explained. Read More

Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (NOAA)

Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary includes 2,408 square nautical miles of marine waters off the rugged Olympic Peninsula coastline. The sanctuary extends 25 to 50 miles seaward, covering much of the continental shelf and several major submarine canyons. The sanctuary protects a productive upwelling zone – home to marine mammals and seabirds. Along its shores are thriving kelp and intertidal communities, teeming with fishes and other sea life. In the darkness of the seafloor, scattered communities of deep sea coral and sponges form habitats for fish and other important marine wildlife. You’ll learn about the Olympic Coast as a place – the qualities that make it extraordinary. Visit The Living Sanctuary to learn about ocean processes, the underwater landscape, marine wildlife, marine habitats and traditional cultures and maritime history. Throughout the website you will also learn about our important work – conserving this incomparable place and its resources for generations to come. Read More

EarthViewer

What did Earth look like 250 million years ago? Or 1 billion years ago? Or 4.5 billion years ago? What was the climate like in the deep past? Find the answers with EarthViewer, an interactive tool for exploring the science of Earth’s deep history. From molten mass to snowball earth, EarthViewer lets you see continents grow and shift as you scroll through billions of years. Additional layers let you and your students explore changes in atmospheric composition, temperature, biodiversity, day length, and solar luminosity over deep time. Read More

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Air-Sea Interaction & Climate

We take a synergistic and interdisciplinary approach to apply space-based observations, ground-based measurements, and numerical model to study the coupled ocean-atmosphere system. We improve the monitoring, from space, of ocean-atmosphere exchanges in momentum, heat and water. We study how these exchanges force ocean circulation and distribute the heat, water, greenhouse gases, and nutrients stored in the ocean. We examine the effect of these exchanges on the energy and hydrologic balances in the atmosphere. We focus on seasonal-to-interannual variability and predictability, but also examine how such variability is affected by shorter time scales (intra-seasonal) changes and longer time scales (decadal) trend. We are planning to study the manifest of long-term and global variability in local and near-term hazards, such as hurricane and monsoon. Read More

NOAA YouTube Chanel

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric ‘s (@NOAA) mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth’s environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Visit us at http://www.noaa.gov and join us on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/usnoaagov), Twitter (https://twitter.com/noaa) and our other social media channels (http://www.noaa.gov/socialmedia). *PLEASE NOTE: NOAA videos are considered public domain and can be used without concern for copyright; however please be sure to properly credit NOAA wherever used, in full or in part. Read More

NASA Television

NASA’s mission is to pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery and aeronautics research. To do that, we have worked around the world — and off it — for more than 50 years, searching for answers to fundamental questions about our place in the universe. We’re exploring space and discovering Earth. Join us for this exciting and important journey. Read More

NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

The Scientific Visualization Studio wants you to learn about NASA programs through visualization. The SVS works closely with scientists in the creation of visualizations, animations, and images in order to promote a greater understanding of Earth and Space Science research activities at NASA and within the academic research community supported by NASA. All the visualizations created by the SVS (currently totalling over 5,500) are accessible to you through this web site, and free to download! Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu