» Technician/Professional/Faculty

Copper Development Association, Inc.

The Copper Development Association Inc. is the market development, engineering and information services arm of the copper industry, chartered to enhance and expand markets for copper and its alloys in North America. Read More

EEResearch Seminars

Environmental Education seminars online, provided by Cornell University, EE Capacity, North American Association for Environmental Education, U.S. EPA, and Civic Ecology Lab. Read More

International Approaches To Renewable Energy Education –A Faculty Professional DevelopmentCase Study With Recommended PracticesFor STEM Educators

Calls for increased international competency in U.S. college graduates and the global nature of the renewable energy industry require an exploration of how to incorporate a global perspective in STEM curricula, and how to best develop faculty providing them with global knowledge and skills necessary to update and improve existing teaching practices. To expand awareness of the global renewable energy sector, a cohort of renewable energy educators from across the United States participated in two international learning exchanges to Australia/New Zealand and Germany/Denmark. The exchanges provided opportunities for the participants to meet with technical educators, visit teaching labs, review industry partnerships, talk with policy makers and government representatives, and to share knowledge and best teaching practices. Three years after the initial international exchange, participant data was collected to measure the extended impact of the experience and the perceived value of various learning activities. The results show that the exchanges expanded participant’s knowledge of renewable energy technologies and issues both in the U.S. and abroad, and also influenced teaching curriculum and instruction, and academic community engagement. This study serves as a model program for providing STEM faculty with rich international experience. The findings in this manuscript highlight the key components to building a successful international professional development program, and illustrate the type of impacts that can result from these activities. The lessons learned are meaningful to other institutions or organizations planning similar international activities in a variety of disciplines. Read More

Global Change Research Highlights: Climate, Irrigation, and Fertilization - Understanding U.S. Crop Yields

Results: Using corn and soybeans as their testing ground, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory devised methods to peer into the mechanisms that modulate crop yield variability. They used statistical models to examine how climate variability impacts yields of these popular bioenergy crops at the county level. Among climate factors, the team showed that temperature is predominant in corn-growing counties, both by volume and percentage of production. Precipitation has a similar impact. The amount of energy from the sun, or radiation, has a much smaller effect USA-wide on both soybeans and corn. To understand the impact of management practices, the research team designed and conducted numerical modeling to reveal how irrigation and fertilization affect crop yield variability. Averaged over the USA, fertilization has a larger impact than irrigation. The work demonstrated that dynamically determining fertilization timing and rates in their models can greatly improve the predictive capability for yields of both crops. Read More

Understanding How Science Really Works

Science is an inspiring process of discovery that helps satisfy the natural curiosity with which we are all born. Unfortunately, traditional instruction that misrepresents science as a body of facts to be memorized and the process of science as a rigid 5-step procedure can deaden students’ spirit of inquiry. Students should come away from our classrooms with an appreciation of the natural world — fascinated by its intricacies and excited to learn more. They should view and value science as a multi-faceted, flexible process for better understanding that world. Such views encourage life-long learning and foster critical thinking about everyday problems students face in their lives. You can cultivate these ways of thinking in your students through science instruction that accurately and enthusiastically communicates the true nature of science and that encourages students to question how we know what we know. Fortunately, fostering such understandings needn’t require reorganizing your entire curriculum. Simple shifts in how content and activities are approached can make a big difference in overcoming student misconceptions and building more accurate views of the process of science. Educational research supports the following strategies for teaching about the scientific endeavor: Make it explicit: Key concepts regarding the nature and process of science should be explicitly and independently emphasized. Engaging in inquiry and studying the history of science are most helpful when the nature-of-science concepts they exemplify are explicitly drawn out in discussion and interactions. Help them reflect: Throughout instruction, students should be encouraged to examine, test, and revise their ideas about what science is and how it works. Give it context, again and again: Key concepts about the nature and process of science should be revisited in multiple contexts throughout the school year, allowing students to see how they apply to real-world situations. We’ve assembled a variety of resources to help you increase student understanding of nature and the process of science. To improve your own content knowledge, explore Understanding Science 101 and our resource library. To prepare yourself with lesson plans, teaching tips, and pedagogical strategies, visit a Teacher’s Lounge or explore the all-level resources listed below and to the right. Read More

Virtual Soil Science Learning Resources

Since its inception in 2004, VSSLR have become nationally and internationally recognized and adopted in soil science courses and natural resource programs at various Canadian and North American universities. The web-based educational resources developed by the VSSLR group serve as the template for continual development of the more comprehensive educational packages. The goal of Virtual Soil Science Learning Resources (VSSLR) group is to enhance soil science education through cooperation and innovative approaches to teaching and learning. The group was initiated by Dr. Maja Krzic (UBC, Vancouver) in 2004 and it has become the focal point for collaborative teaching efforts among scientists, students, and multimedia experts from 7 universities and 3 research institutions in Canada. Various web-based learning resources and on-line courses developed by our group are featured at this site. If you are looking for new ideas on how to enhance your soil science and natural resource courses or if you are striving to gain a better understanding of basic soil processed you might find these resources useful. Read More

Environmentalscience.org

Our Mission EnvironmentalScience.org’s mission is to be the most reliable and expansive advocate for environmental science education and careers. About Our Data Information, statistics, and data featured on our site was taken from federal and state agencies, including: IPEDS – The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System NCES – National Center for Education Statistics BLS – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching Read More

Amoeba Sisters

Online Resource including short clips, handouts, comics, and GIFs for teachers and students. The clips make Biology topics accessible to students at all levels, from high school Biology, AP Biology, to college Biology courses. Read More

Crash Course Videos

Fantastic online videos for students and teachers on subjects such as: Astronomy, Anatomy & Physiology, Biology, Ecology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, U.S. History, World History, Economics, and U.S. Government and Politics. Read More

Brian Cox experiments: Primary science

Education in science and mathematics should develop the natural intellectual curiosity and creativity of young people. Creative and experimental approaches will be particularly important for keeping students interested and engaged in science, and for equipping them well for the future, whether or not they pursue a career in science. To support this activity in primary schools, Brian Cox, the Society’s Professor for Public Engagement in Science, presents a series of video resources to increase teachers’ confidence with experimental science and relate the experiments to the real world. The resources support six experiments across the primary science curriculum, and each written resource is supported by four videos: Set up video: this video explains what has to be prepared for the experiment in advance and what health and safety concerns should be considered for a risk assessment. This is for teachers to view in advance of running the experiment. Experiment video: this video shows the experiment taking place, gives examples of common areas where students make mistakes and outlines how to address these. This for teachers to view in advance of running the experiment. Real life video: this video gives an example of a real life context where the experiment topic is relevant, allowing students to understand how the activity they have done is important. This is for teachers to show as part of the class activities. Research video: this video gives an example of current research in an area related to the topic of the experiment, allowing students to see what scientists look like and understand what kind of areas they could investigate if they continue in science. This is for teachers to show as part of the class activities. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu