» Technician/Professional/Faculty

Energy Literacy Videos

The world of energy doesn’t have to be complex. These short, concise videos will introduce you to the basics of energy. Read More

National Geographic: Freshwater

Freshwater ecosystems–lakes, rivers, and the smaller ponds and streams–make up only two percent of Earth’s water resources, and only one percent remains drinkable. Learn more about the planet’s freshwater and how you can protect what’s left. Read More

STEM Learning

Specially selected for teachers and technicians of science; browse resources, professional development, news and opinions. Join in the discussion with our community groups. Read More

StudentEnergy

In a world where energy information is dominated by polarized soundbites, Student Energy is on a mission to deliver accurate and unbiased energy information to students across the world. StudentEnergy.org is a universal entry point for learning about the energy system. Read More

SHIFT: Trash Talk Documentary

Over 300 millions tonnes of solid waste is produced in North America every year–a number so big, it’s virtually meaningless. In this documentary, we measure our waste footprint by storing our trash, recycling, and composting for 30 days. We visit the Vancouver Landfill in Delta after the city-wide organics ban is implemented to see where all our food waste has been going. We then meet three local innovators (Enterra Feed Co, Harvest Power, Northwest Waste Solutions) who are changing the way the world thinks about solid waste. Produced with the support of TELUS. Read More

TED-Ed: What really happens to the plastic you throw away - Emma Bryce

We’ve all been told that we should recycle plastic bottles and containers. But what actually happens to the plastic if we just throw it away? Emma Bryce traces the life cycles of three different plastic bottles, shedding light on the dangers these disposables present to our world. Read More

Mass extinction: Mike Coffin at TEDxHobart

A mass extinction is defined when Earth loses more than three quarters of its total estimated species in a geologically short timeframe. The planet has experienced five such events over its ~4.5 billion year history, with causes thought to include meteor collisions, massive volcanic eruptions and sudden climate fluctuations. Now a growing body of evidence suggests that mankind itself may be responsible for a mass extinction to rival all others, now well underway. Professor Mike Coffin, Executive Director of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania, is an oceanographer. His research expertise encompasses interactions between the oceanic environment and the solid Earth. Educated at Dartmouth College (AB) and Columbia University (MA, MPhil, PhD) in the United States, he has pursued an international career that reflects the boundless nature of the global ocean. Following university studies, he has worked at Geoscience Australia (1985-1989), the University of Texas at Austin (1990-2001), the University of Tokyo (2001-2007), the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (2002-2003), the UK’s University of Southampton and National Oceanography Centre (2007-2010), and the University of Tasmania (2011-). He has also held visiting positions Dartmouth College (1982), the University of Oslo (1992, 1996), Geoscience Australia (2000), France’s University of Strasbourg (2001), and the University of Hawaii (2002). From 2003-2005, he served as the inaugural chair of the Science Planning Committee of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, the largest international program in the earth and ocean sciences, and among the largest in any scientific discipline. Prof Coffin has lead or participated in 29 blue-water research expeditions at sea, focusing mainly in the Southern, Pacific, and Indian oceans. Read More

Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne is a multidisciplinary science and engineering research center, where talented scientists and engineers work together to answer the biggest questions facing humanity, from how to obtain affordable clean energy to protecting ourselves and our environment. Ever since we were born out of the University of Chicago’s work on the Manhattan Project in the 1940s, our goal has been to make an impact — from the atomic to the human to the global scale. The laboratory works in concert with universities, industry, and other national laboratories on questions and experiments too large for any one institution to do by itself. Through collaborations here and around the world, we strive to discover new ways to develop energy innovations through science, create novel materials molecule-by-molecule, and gain a deeper understanding of our planet, our climate, and the cosmos. Surrounded by the highest concentration of top-tier research organizations in the world, Argonne leverages its Chicago-area location to lead discovery and to power innovation in a wide range of core scientific capabilities, from high-energy physics and materials science to biology and advanced computer science. Read More

The Antarctic Ozone Hole

The Antarctic Ozone Hole is an annual springtime event above Earth’s frozen, southernmost continent. Manmade CFCs, naturally occurring Polar Stratospheric Clouds, and the return of sunlight set off incredible destruction of the protective Ozone Layer. This video presents these complicated processes with simple to understand animations. Read More

RECARE: Preventing and Remediating Degradation of Soils in Europe Through Land Care

This site is for those people who are interested in learning about the threats to our soils and measures to prevent and remediate against soil degradation. The site is linked to research that is being undertaken by the EU funded RECARE project. Soil functions are threatened globally by a wide range of processes, and in Europe, a number of threats have been identified in the European Soil Thematic Strategy. The challenge is to prevent degradation and its adverse effects on soil functions and ecosystem services, while simultaneously improving livelihoods. Our aim for the Hub is to provide information and guidance to help practitioners, researchers, policy-makers and the wider public to understand the impact of soil degradation upon soil functions and ecosystem services and to identify innovative measures to prevent and remediate against soil degradation. If you are interested in learning about specific soil threats, you may find it helpful to start on the Soil Threats pages for an overview of different processes that impact our soil. If you are interested in more detailed guidance for assessing soil degradation or learning about management measures to prevent and remediate against soil degradation, these are provided under Tools and Outputs. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu