» Intermediate (3-5)

NOAA: How does overfishing threaten coral reefs?

Coral reef ecosystems support important commercial, recreational, and subsistence fishery resources in the U.S and its territories. Fishing also plays a central social and cultural role in many island and coastal communities, where it is often a critical source of food and income. The impacts from unsustainable fishing on coral reef areas can lead to the depletion of key reef species in many locations. Such losses often have a ripple effect, not just on the coral reef ecosystems themselves, but also on the local economies that depend on them. Additionally, certain types of fishing gear can inflict serious physical damage to coral reefs, seagrass beds, and other important marine habitats. Coral reef fisheries, though often relatively small in scale, may have disproportionately large impacts on the ecosystem if conducted unsustainably. Rapid human population growth, increased demand, use of more efficient fishery technologies, and inadequate management and enforcement have led to the depletion of key reef species and habitat damage in many locations. Read More

Global Oneness Project

Our stories explore cultural, social and environmental issues with a humanistic lens. Aligned to National and Common Core standards, our lesson plans, available in both English or Spanish, offer an interdisciplinary approach to learning and facilitates the development of active, critical thinking. Read More

Tara Expeditions

Tara expeditions organizes voyages to study and understand the impact of climate change and the ecological crisis facing the world’s oceans. Tara’s scientific expeditions study three main research themes: ocean and mankind, ocean and biodiversity, and ocean and climate. Learn more here. Read More

National Geographic: Freshwater

Freshwater ecosystems–lakes, rivers, and the smaller ponds and streams–make up only two percent of Earth’s water resources, and only one percent remains drinkable. Learn more about the planet’s freshwater and how you can protect what’s left. Read More

STEM Learning

Specially selected for teachers and technicians of science; browse resources, professional development, news and opinions. Join in the discussion with our community groups. Read More

EEResearch Seminars

Environmental Education seminars online, provided by Cornell University, EE Capacity, North American Association for Environmental Education, U.S. EPA, and Civic Ecology Lab. Read More

Understanding How Science Really Works

Science is an inspiring process of discovery that helps satisfy the natural curiosity with which we are all born. Unfortunately, traditional instruction that misrepresents science as a body of facts to be memorized and the process of science as a rigid 5-step procedure can deaden students’ spirit of inquiry. Students should come away from our classrooms with an appreciation of the natural world — fascinated by its intricacies and excited to learn more. They should view and value science as a multi-faceted, flexible process for better understanding that world. Such views encourage life-long learning and foster critical thinking about everyday problems students face in their lives. You can cultivate these ways of thinking in your students through science instruction that accurately and enthusiastically communicates the true nature of science and that encourages students to question how we know what we know. Fortunately, fostering such understandings needn’t require reorganizing your entire curriculum. Simple shifts in how content and activities are approached can make a big difference in overcoming student misconceptions and building more accurate views of the process of science. Educational research supports the following strategies for teaching about the scientific endeavor: Make it explicit: Key concepts regarding the nature and process of science should be explicitly and independently emphasized. Engaging in inquiry and studying the history of science are most helpful when the nature-of-science concepts they exemplify are explicitly drawn out in discussion and interactions. Help them reflect: Throughout instruction, students should be encouraged to examine, test, and revise their ideas about what science is and how it works. Give it context, again and again: Key concepts about the nature and process of science should be revisited in multiple contexts throughout the school year, allowing students to see how they apply to real-world situations. We’ve assembled a variety of resources to help you increase student understanding of nature and the process of science. To improve your own content knowledge, explore Understanding Science 101 and our resource library. To prepare yourself with lesson plans, teaching tips, and pedagogical strategies, visit a Teacher’s Lounge or explore the all-level resources listed below and to the right. Read More

Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary

Picture yourself over 100 miles from land, in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico. At times, the seas can be very unforgiving, and the weather can turn foul in an instant. But here, in the midst of this unpredictable Gulf, lie three of the most beautiful and wild places in all the world. Manta rays, whale sharks, coral heads bigger than cars, hundreds of species of fish and invertebrates… This place teems with life! Read More

World's Largest Marine Reserve Created Off Antarctica

New 598,000 square-mile protected area is more than twice the size of Texas, and will protect everything from penguins to whales. Read More

Minerals Education Coalition

The Minerals Education Coalition’s mission is to identify, produce and disseminate fact-based K-12 minerals education lessons and activities and to inform and educate the general public about the importance of mining in their everyday lives. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu