» College - Graduate Level

Shifts in mating strategies help herbicide-resistant ‘superweeds’ persist

Herbicide-resistant “superweeds” change their mating strategies over time, an evolutionary shift that helps them hold onto valuable genes and outcompete other plants, according to a new study from University of Michigan researchers. The study examined the relationships between plant mating systems and herbicide resistance in the common agricultural weed morning glory. The researchers found that morning glory populations that have evolved resistance to the herbicide Roundup rely on self-fertilization more than susceptible populations do. Read More

Children and Nature Network

The Children & Nature Network is leading the movement to connect all children, their families and communities to nature through innovative ideas, evidence-based resources and tools, broad-based collaboration and support of grassroots leadership. Read More

USDA Web Soil Survey

Web Soil Survey (WSS) provides soil data and information produced by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It is operated by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and provides access to the largest natural resource information system in the world. NRCS has soil maps and data available online for more than 95 percent of the nation’s counties and anticipates having 100 percent in the near future. The site is updated and maintained online as the single authoritative source of soil survey information. Read More

Arctic Resilience Report Website

The Arctic region is changing rapidly, in ways that could dramatically affect people’s lives and ecosystems. Climate change is a major concern, but rapid economic development and social transformation could also make significant impacts. Some changes may be gradual, but there may also be large and sudden shifts. For those charged with managing natural resources and public policy in the region, it is crucial to identify potential thresholds to prepare effectively for an uncertain future. The Arctic Resilience Report is a science-based assessment that aims to better understand the integrated impacts of change in the Arctic. Its goals are to: • Identify the potential for shocks and large shifts in ecosystems services that affect human well-being in the Arctic. • Analyze how different drivers of change interact in ways that affect the ability of ecosystems and human populations to withstand shocks, adapt or transform. • Evaluate strategies for governments and communities to adapt. The Arctic Resilience Report is led by the Stockholm Environment Institute and the Stockholm Resilience Centre and engages experts from across the Arctic. Read More

Google Timelapse

Timelapse is a global, zoomable video that lets you see how the Earth has changed over the past 32 years. It is made from 33 cloud-free annual mosaics, one for each year from 1984 to 2016, which are made interactively explorable by Carnegie Mellon University CREATE Lab’s Time Machine library, a technology for creating and viewing zoomable and pannable timelapses over space and time. Using Earth Engine, we combined over 5 million satellite images acquired over the past three decades by 5 different satellites. The majority of the images come from Landsat, a joint USGS/NASA Earth observation program that has observed the Earth since the 1970s. For 2015 and 2016, we combined Landsat 8 imagery with imagery from Sentinel-2A, part of the European Commission and European Space Agency’s Copernicus Earth observation program. Search, pan, or zoom around to begin exploring our new Timelapse, or even check out our YouTube highlights. To embed the timelapse viewer on your site, use the “Share or embed” button above. You can also create a timelapse tour that moves from one destination to another over time using the Timelapse Tour Editor. Timelapse is an example that illustrates the power of Earth Engine’s cloud-computing model, which enables users such as scientists, researchers, and journalists to detect changes, map trends, and quantify differences on the Earth’s surface using Google’s computational infrastructure and the multi-petabyte Earth Engine data catalog. Read More

How Clean is Your Electric Vehicle

Electric cars tend to produce less carbon pollution than gas-powered ones—but just how much less? Enter your ZIP code below to see how different types of vehicles stack up in your area. Entering a make, model, and year will narrow results to a specific EV model. Read More

How much carbon dioxide is produced when different fuels are burned?

Different fuels emit different amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) in relation to the energy they produce when burned. To analyze emissions across fuels, compare the amount of CO2 emitted per unit of energy output or heat content. Read More

University of Hawaii Sea Level Center

The UHSLC serves multiple roles in support of real-time oceanographic operations as well as climate and oceanographic research. The UHSLC collaborates with agencies within host countries to install and maintain a global network of tide gauge stations that range in utility from tsunami warning to global sea level rise. The growing UHSLC network consists of more than 80 stations. The data are routinely processed, analyzed, and distributed at varying levels of temporal resolution and quality control that fill multiple end-user needs. UHSLC datasets are used for assimilation into operational numerical models, the calibration of satellite altimeter data, the production of oceanographic products, and research on various time-scales from decadal climate fluctuations to short-term extreme events. UHSLC real-time data contribute to the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center and other operational warning agencies. Over the years the UHSLC has participated in national and international research programs including NORPAX, TOGA, WOCE, GODAE and CLIVAR. Read More

EPA Nonpoint Source Success Stories

This Nonpoint Source Success Stories web site features stories about primarily nonpoint source-impaired waterbodies where restoration efforts have led to documented water quality improvements. Waterbodies are separated into three categories of stories, depending on the type of water quality improvement achieved: Type 1. Stories about partially or fully restored waterbodies Type 2. Stories that show progress toward achieving water quality goals Type 3. Stories about ecological restoration Read More

Earth Right Now (NASA)

NASA uses the vantage point of space to increase our understanding of our home planet, improve lives, and safeguard our future. We monitor Earth’s vital signs from land, air and space with a fleet of satellites and ambitious airborne and ground-based observation campaigns. NASA develops new ways to observe and study Earth’s interconnected natural systems with long-term data records. The agency freely shares this unique knowledge and works with institutions around the world. Scientists worldwide use NASA data to tackle some of the biggest questions about how our planet is changing now and how Earth could change in the future. From rising sea levels to the changing availability of freshwater, NASA enables studies that unravel the complexities of our planet from the highest reaches of Earth’s atmosphere to its core. NASA’s Earth science work also makes a difference in people’s lives around the world every day. From farms to our national parks, from today’s response to natural disasters to tomorrow’s air quality, from the Arctic to the Amazon, NASA is working for you 24/7. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as weather forecasting and natural resource management. All of this new knowledge about our home planet enables policy makers, government agencies and other stakeholders to make more informed decisions on critical issues that occur all around the world. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu