» Watersheds and Wetlands

EPA Office of Water

The Office of Water (OW) ensures drinking water is safe, and restores and maintains oceans, watersheds, and their aquatic ecosystems to protect human health, support economic and recreational activities, and provide healthy habitat for fish, plants and wildlife. OW is responsible for implementing the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act, and portions of the Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments of 1990, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Ocean Dumping Ban Act, Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act, Shore Protection Act, Marine Plastics Pollution Research and Control Act, London Dumping Convention, the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships and several other statutes. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the Office of Water works with the ten EPA regional offices, other federal agencies, state and local governments, American Indian tribes, the regulated community, organized professional and interest groups, land owners and managers, and the public-at-large. OW provides guidance, specifies scientific methods and data collection requirements, performs oversight and facilitates communication among those involved. OW helps the states and American Indian tribes to build capacity, and water programs can be delegated to them for implementation. Read More

Connectivity of Streams and Wetlands to Downstream Waters: A Review and Synthesis of the Scientific Evidence (Final Report)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Office of Research and Development has finalized the report “Connectivity of Streams and Wetlands to Downstream Waters: A Review and Synthesis of the Scientific Evidence.” The report reviews more than 1,200 peer-reviewed publications and summarizes current scientific understanding about the connectivity and mechanisms by which streams and wetlands, singly or in aggregate, affect the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of downstream waters. The focus of the report is on surface and shallow subsurface connections by which small or temporary streams, nontidal wetlands, and open waters affect larger waters such as rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and estuaries. Read More

Nonpoint Pollution for Municipal Officials (NEMO): Tools and Resources

Basic NEMO (Nonpoint source pollution Education for Municipal Officials) presentations, fact sheets, and soap box articles regarding the link between land use and water quality. NEMO has come to stand for outreach programs that provide resources that allow for good land use planning and site design that balances growth AND environmental protection. Read More

Visual Tools for Watershed Education: National Leadership Forum Report (November 1999)

On November 17, 1999 some 120 education, environmental and communication leaders from across the nation assembled at the headquarters of the Academy for Educational Development in Washington, DC to take part in a forum that focused directly on how visual tools – maps, graphics, models and stories (mental pictures) –could help policy leaders, teachers, the media, and others to communicate meaningfully on the concept of watersheds. The modern need for addressing environmental and natural resource issues more systemically has given rise to greater emphasis on “watershed” approaches in planning, resource assessment and even political activism. It is rare in this day and age to have a discussion of water resources, fish and wildlife conservation, pollution control, flooding, weather, forestry, even land us management without making a mention of watersheds. Many public agencies and private land managers are fully and officially engaged in watershed management approaches. Even major new legislative initiatives discuss watersheds. Read More

Selection and Use of Aquatic Vegetation by Migratory Waterfowl in North Central Texas

Assessment of aquatic plant selection by waterfowl has been conducted during the winters of 1997-2000 on 49 0.2-0.79 ha research ponds in north central Texas. Ponds were categorized by dominant plant species into eight habitat types. Census with waterfowl species identification were performed to investigate impacts of aquatic vegetation and water depth on waterfowl. Eighteen waterfowl species were observed. Peak migration occurred in late December/early January. Mixed native ponds and mixed native/hydrilla ponds were the most frequently selected habitat types. The study included correlation analysis between pond water levels and waterfowl use. Full ponds received greatest use followed by half full ponds, while almost empty ponds received minimal use. Time activity budgets were conducted on waterfowl utilizing mixed native and hydrilla ponds to compare waterfowl time partitioning on native aquatic vegetation versus hydrilla. Although only minor differences were found in time budgets, social status appears to be strongly related to habitat selection. Ducks on native ponds were paired (86%), conversely no ducks on hydrilla ponds were paired. Hydrilla pond although frequently utilized, were populated by lower status birds mostly single hens. Read More

Nonpoint Source Kids Page

Six activities for understanding nonpoint source pollution. Read More

Bird Conservation

This Web site explores the links between EPA programs and bird conservation. (“The inclusion of a link on this page does not constitute an endorsement by EPA of any organization’s policies or activities, or of any item for sale. EPA makes no guarantees regarding information, data or links contained on non-EPA web sites. Please note that many of the following links will transport you off the EPA server.”) Read More

“Life By The Drop: Africa and the Global Water Challenge.”

A four-part series of articles on climate change and population growth effects on the quantity and quality of water in Kenya. Read More

Welcome to The United States Geological Survey

Links to reports published by the Iowa Water Science Center on historic floods, annual water data, real-time data, streamflow data, and weather station information in the state of Iowa. Read More

Rivervision: Consensus Plan C

Map of urban wetlands and green spaces along the Mississippi River at Davenport, IA and Rock Island, IL Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu