» Wastewater and Water

Conquest of the Land Through Seven Thousand Years

A 24-page booklet reviewing the development of agriculture. Read More

Agriculture teaching resources

Landscaping, farming and plant science teaching resources suitable for BTEC, NVQ and other vocational agriculture courses. From instructional PowerPoints to worksheets, videos to case studies, there’s plenty to help prepare students for the world of work. Read More

Department of Agriculture and Food Teaching Resources

DAFWA supports the growth of Western Australia’s agrifood sector in four key areas: markets, productivity, profitability and people. For schools, links to a range of agriculture, environment, food and fibre education resources including classroom activities, information and tools have been compiled for use by teachers. Read More

National Agricultural Literacy Outcomes

We are a nation that has reaped the benefits of a successful agricultural system. This has allowed our society to flourish, engage in leisure activities, and dream about future endeavors. Our successful innovations concerning food and fiber has resulted in fewer farmers and larger yields. However, this success story has come with a consequence—a society that has little understanding concerning agricultural production and processing, and how this system meets our basic needs (food, clothing, shelter), and relates or interacts with a sustainable environment and our quality of life. Daily decisions made by individuals, through dollars and voting, affect our agricultural system—from soil to spoon. If U.S. agriculture is going to continue to meet the needs of the U.S. population and address growing global needs, agriculture needs to be understood and valued by all. Read More

AgroWorld (National Agriculture in the Classroom)

National Agriculture in the Classroom bimonthly secondary educator e-Zine that shares websites and articles that contextualizes learning. Read More

Convention on Biological Diversity Teaching Resources

Teaching students about biodiversity, or the variety of life on Earth, is a daunting yet exciting task. The Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity wants to support you in guiding students through a fascinating and exciting exploration of biodiversity issues. For our first project, we’ve designed an educational module on biodiversity and agriculture. It comprises of an online educational web portal for primary school students and five accompanying lesson plans for educators. Educators can also download the children’s web portal in a booklet format below. The resources are aimed at students in upper primary school (grades four to six), but could be adapted for other levels. Read More

TEACHING AND LEARNING FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE Multimedia Teacher Education Programme

Close to one trillion people in the world do not have sufficient food for a healthy and active life. While much progress has been made towards food security in recent decades, without further urgent and coordinated action, poverty, hunger and malnutrition will continue to undermine the lives of hundreds of millions of people now and in years to come. The world’s population reached 6 billion people in 1999 and is expected to reach 8.5 billion by 2025, when 83% of the world will be living in the South. However, our long-term ability to meet growing demands for food often seems uncertain. Thus, one of our greatest challenges is increasing food production in a sustainable manner so that everyone can be adequately and nutritiously fed without over-exploiting the Earth’s ecosystems. This module introduces the main goals of sustainable agriculture and examines a range of sustainable farming practices and case studies. As such, it develops an understanding of how sustainable farming can both enhance food production and ensure that natural resources are managed in the best way possible for long-term sustainability. The module also provides ideas about ways in which the theme of sustainable agriculture may be integrated into the curriculum as part of the process of reorienting education towards a sustainable future. Read More

Native Shrubs for the Increasingly Challenging Landscape Environment

The sustainable landscape featuring native plants is a rapidly expanding trend in horticulture. Native plants enhance the local ecology by providing habitat for wildlife and support for pollinators. A number of important ornamentals have been identified as invasive and will no longer be available due to plant bans, both voluntary and involuntary. Native species are by definition not invasive and offer a sustainable alternative. This article previously appeared in the Connecticut Botanical Society Newsletter About the Author: Dr. Jessica Lubell is an Associate Professor of Horticulture at the University of Connecticut. She has 15 years of experience working with the green industry. She has worked closely with growers to expand production of new native shrubs. Dr. Lubell is the 2015 recipient of the New England Nursery Association Young Nursery Professional Award. You can follow her research and outreach work on Facebook at Native Plant Gal. Read More

USDA Water Quality Information Center (WQIC)

Water Quality Information Center (WQIC) provides electronic access to information on water quality and agriculture. The center collects, organizes, and communicates the scientific findings, educational methodologies, and public policy issues related to water quality and agriculture. Read More

NOAA Education Resources: Freshwater

Although NOAA is known for its work in marine habitats, the agency has resource management, stewardship, research, and monitoring responsibilities for many freshwater ecosystems. NOAA satellites monitor the water supply for the planet, mapping snow and ice fields and providing predictions of where, when, and in what volume water for drinking and agriculture will be available. River level forecasts are a key component of the agency’s mission to protect life and property as well as manage navigability of waterways. Monitoring and managing the freshwater habitats of anadramous fish like the Pacific Salmon in partnership with local agencies is another key role in freshwater environments. NOAA’s presence in the Great Lakes region of the U.S. represents one of the largest agency operations dealing with freshwater. Great Lake coastal zone issues, historic and ecosystem sanctuaries, freshwater estuaries, environmental monitoring, and fishery management research are all part of NOAA’s operations. The collections in this thematic area are designed to assist the educator in teaching concepts and processes related to freshwater environments and to increase stewardship of these important resources. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu