» Site Management

Teaching Resources - Ecosystems

The EPA’s extensive ecosystem resources for K-12 teachers. Read More

Stormwater Management Techniques in Use at EPA Headquarters

The stormwater management techniques employed in EPA’s Headquarters Low Impact Development (LID) projects include several best management practices such as: bioretention cells, cisterns, permeable pavement, permeable pavers, and soil amendments. Read More

Soil and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Act

This law was passed by the Republic of China (Taiwan) to protect public health and the environment by preventing soil and groundwater pollution, and by promoting the sustainable use of soil and groundwater. Read More

Investigation of Lead Hydrolytic Polymerization and Interactions with Organic Ligands in the Soil/Sediment-water Environment

The objective of this research was to investigate lead speciation in the soil/sediment-water environment and to better understand how the species affect lead mobility under different environmental conditions. The research involved both field soil and sediment samples as well as standard lead solutions. Field samples were fully characterized and extracted by aqueous and organic solvents. The results were compared and evaluated with the metal speciation model, MINTEQA2. Hydrolytic polymerization and organic complexation studies were conducted with standard lead solutions under controlled experimental conditions. Results of the field samples showed that pH, dissolved cations, ionic strength, dissolved organic matter, and nature of the soil/sediment matrix play major roles in the distribution and mobility of lead (Pb) from contaminated sites. In the aqueous equilibration experiment, the magnitude of Pb2+ solubilization was in the order of pH4>pH7>pH9. The results were in good agreement with MINTEQA2 predictions. An important finding of the research is the detection of Pb polymerization species under controlled experimental conditions. At pH 5.22, Pb polymeric species were formed at rate of 0.03 per day. The role of Pb complexation with organic matter was evaluated in both field and standard samples. Different methodologies showed three types of organically bound Pb. A very small fraction of Pb, in the ppb range, was extractable from the contaminated soil by polar organic solvents. Sequential extractions show that 16.6±1.4 % of the Pb is organically complexed. Complexation of Pb with fulvic acid provided new information on the extent of Pb association with soluble organic matter. The overall results of this research have provided new and useful information regarding Pb speciation in environmental samples. The results, in several instances, have provided verification of MINTEQA2 model’s prediction. They also revealed areas of disagreement between the models prediction and the experimental results. A positive note regarding the experimental work done in the research is the verification of the mass balance in all the repeated experiments. Read More

Characterizing Storm Water Runoff from Natural Gas Well Sites in Denton County, Texas

Library Holdings. In order to better understand runoff characteristics from natural gas well sites in north central Texas, the City of Denton, with assistance through an EPA funded 104b3 Water Quality Cooperative Agreement, monitored storm water runoff from local natural gas well sites. Storm water runoff was found to contain high concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS). Observed TSS concentrations resulted in sediment loading rates that are similar to those observed from typical construction activities. Petroleum hydrocarbons, in contrast, were rarely detected in runoff samples. Heavy metals were detected in concentrations similar to those observed in typical urban runoff. However, the concentrations observed at the gas well sites were higher than those measured at nearby reference sites. Storm water runoff data collected from these sites were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the water erosion prediction project (WEPP) model for predicting runoff and sediment from these sites. Runoff and sediment predictions were adequate; however, rainfall simulation experiments were used to further characterize the portion of the site where drilling and extraction operations are performed, referred to as the “pad site.” These experiments were used to develop specific pad site erosion parameters for the WEPP model. Finally, version 2 of the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE 2.0) was used to evaluate the efficiency of best management practices (BMPs) for natural gas well sites. BMP efficiency ratings, which ranged from 52 to 93%, were also evaluated in the context of site management goals and implementation cost, demonstrating a practical approach for managing soil loss and understanding the importance of selecting appropriate site-specific BMPs. Read More

IICRC Standards

Downloadable documents on Standard and Reference Guide for Professional Water Damage Restoration and Standard and Reference Guide for Professional Mold Remediation Read More

RecycleMania

RecycleMania is a friendly competition and benchmarking tool for college and university recycling programs to promote waste reduction activities to their campus communities. Over a 10-week period, schools report recycling and trash data which are then ranked according to who collects the largest amount of recyclables per capita, the largest amount of total recyclables, the least amount of trash per capita, or have the highest recycling rate. With each week’s reports and rankings, participating schools watch how their results fluctuate against other schools and use this to rally their campus communities to reduce and recycle more. Read More

Brownfields Job Training Grant Brochure

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Brownfields Job Training Program to help ensure that the residents of communities most affected by brownfields would share in the benefits of their cleanup and reuse. The Job Training Program transforms lives by empowering unemployed and underemployed, predominantly low-income and minority residents of Brownfields communities. The Program does this by providing funding and technical assistance for environmental cleanup and health and safety training to organizations currently training residents of brownfieldsimpacted communities who are seeking new skills and greater earning potential. The Program helps clean up brownfields, spurs sustainable economic development, and creates a pool of skilled workers capable of meeting the environmental cleanup and green jobs industries’ demand for workers. Read More

Brownfields Toolbox

The purpose of this Brownfields ToolBox is to provide members of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Brownfields Initiative communities with the knowledge and tools necessary to undertake activities that will maximize environmental job development, education, and employment opportunities for residents living in those communities. The Toolbox was rebuilt and expanded in 2009 to include Professional Learning Community (PLC) resources, Web forums, FAQ’s, Announcements, Related Links, a Job Development site map, and much more. Read More

Job Training Pilots/Grants

Job Training Grants are funded up to $200,000 over two years. These Grants bring together community groups, job training organizations, educators, labor groups, investors, lenders, developers, and other affected parties to address the issue of providing environmental employment and training for residents in communities impacted by Brownfields. EPA’s Brownfields Program is an organized commitment to help communities revitalize Brownfields properties both environmentally and economically, mitigate potential health risks, and restore economic vitality to areas where Brownfields exist. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu