» Sampling and Monitoring

Civil Infrastructure: Advanced Sensing Technologies and Advanced Repair Materials for the Infrastructure: Water Systems, Dams, Levees, Bridges, Roads, and Highways

An 11-page draft of a white paper on the needed improvements in cost-effective inspection and monitoring of critical infrastructure systems and transformational improvements in materials and technologies for application of these materials. Read More

Books on Global Warming

A list of recommended books on global warming and climate change for science, business, and children. Read More

Investigation of Lead Hydrolytic Polymerization and Interactions with Organic Ligands in the Soil/Sediment-water Environment

The objective of this research was to investigate lead speciation in the soil/sediment-water environment and to better understand how the species affect lead mobility under different environmental conditions. The research involved both field soil and sediment samples as well as standard lead solutions. Field samples were fully characterized and extracted by aqueous and organic solvents. The results were compared and evaluated with the metal speciation model, MINTEQA2. Hydrolytic polymerization and organic complexation studies were conducted with standard lead solutions under controlled experimental conditions. Results of the field samples showed that pH, dissolved cations, ionic strength, dissolved organic matter, and nature of the soil/sediment matrix play major roles in the distribution and mobility of lead (Pb) from contaminated sites. In the aqueous equilibration experiment, the magnitude of Pb2+ solubilization was in the order of pH4>pH7>pH9. The results were in good agreement with MINTEQA2 predictions. An important finding of the research is the detection of Pb polymerization species under controlled experimental conditions. At pH 5.22, Pb polymeric species were formed at rate of 0.03 per day. The role of Pb complexation with organic matter was evaluated in both field and standard samples. Different methodologies showed three types of organically bound Pb. A very small fraction of Pb, in the ppb range, was extractable from the contaminated soil by polar organic solvents. Sequential extractions show that 16.6±1.4 % of the Pb is organically complexed. Complexation of Pb with fulvic acid provided new information on the extent of Pb association with soluble organic matter. The overall results of this research have provided new and useful information regarding Pb speciation in environmental samples. The results, in several instances, have provided verification of MINTEQA2 model’s prediction. They also revealed areas of disagreement between the models prediction and the experimental results. A positive note regarding the experimental work done in the research is the verification of the mass balance in all the repeated experiments. Read More

Characterizing Storm Water Runoff from Natural Gas Well Sites in Denton County, Texas

Library Holdings. In order to better understand runoff characteristics from natural gas well sites in north central Texas, the City of Denton, with assistance through an EPA funded 104b3 Water Quality Cooperative Agreement, monitored storm water runoff from local natural gas well sites. Storm water runoff was found to contain high concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS). Observed TSS concentrations resulted in sediment loading rates that are similar to those observed from typical construction activities. Petroleum hydrocarbons, in contrast, were rarely detected in runoff samples. Heavy metals were detected in concentrations similar to those observed in typical urban runoff. However, the concentrations observed at the gas well sites were higher than those measured at nearby reference sites. Storm water runoff data collected from these sites were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the water erosion prediction project (WEPP) model for predicting runoff and sediment from these sites. Runoff and sediment predictions were adequate; however, rainfall simulation experiments were used to further characterize the portion of the site where drilling and extraction operations are performed, referred to as the “pad site.” These experiments were used to develop specific pad site erosion parameters for the WEPP model. Finally, version 2 of the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE 2.0) was used to evaluate the efficiency of best management practices (BMPs) for natural gas well sites. BMP efficiency ratings, which ranged from 52 to 93%, were also evaluated in the context of site management goals and implementation cost, demonstrating a practical approach for managing soil loss and understanding the importance of selecting appropriate site-specific BMPs. Read More

Contaminant Occurrence Studies

Large-scale studies of the occurrence and distribution of new contaminants in the environment – Reconnaissance studies. Read More

Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring Superfund Research Program

This was the first of two seminars on Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring sponsored by the NIEHS Superfund Basic Research Program and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Technology Innovation Program. Dr. Michael Denison and Shirley Gee from the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) presented their work on the development of miniaturized, fast, sensitive bioassay systems for use in environmental research and monitoring at hazardous waste sites. Dr. Ian Kennedy, also from UC Davis, discussed his advances in nanotechnology and the use of MEMs (Micro Electro Mechanical system) fabrication techniques to make a micro-sized instrument for optical detection of trace amounts of chemicals in aqueous solutions. Read More

How Safe is Your Drinking Water?

Most community water suppliers deliver high quality drinking water to millions of people every day. Of the more than 55,000 Community Water Systems in the United States, only 4,769 or 8.6 percent reported a violation of one or more drinking water health standards in 1996. Read More

Cryptosporidim parvum: an emerging pathogen

Greg Hannahs from Kenyon College provides comprehensive information on this parasite. Sections include: introduction, life cycle, clinical manifestations, epidemiology, transmission, pathogenesis, detection & diagnosis, treatment, drinking water purification & filtration, and recent progress & future directions. Links and other references are provided. Read More

Fecal Coliform Bacteria

This site provides basic information related to fecal coliform bacteria. Links to related sites are provided. Read More

Stream Ecology Center

This site is an Idaho State University site involved with various aspects of stream ecology, predominantly in the west. Access to publications and reports plus selected links in the area of stream ecology are provided Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu