» Nanotechnology

Welcome to Nanoscience: Interdisciplinary Environmental Explorations, Grades 9–12

Welcome to Nanoscience introduces nanotechnology through investigations of groundwater and is targeted for use in high school Biology, Chemistry and Earth and Environmental Science Classes. The curriculum consists of a set of nano-science lessons which can be taught as stand alone lessons or as a whole curriculum. Taken as a whole, the materials span approximately three weeks of in-class instructional activities. The curriculum booklet includes several introductory chapters that provide background on nano-scale science and technology. Each classroom-tested, inquiry-based investigation follows the BSCS 5E Instructional Model and includes step-by-step instructions, materials lists, and data charts. Teachers may choose to use individual lessons or adopt the book in its entirety. Welcome to Nanoscience helps biology, chemistry, and Earth and environmental science teachers at the secondary level introduce the science behind nanotechnology into their curriculum. The authors begin with historical background, include tips on how to use the book, and lessons are mapped to National Science Education Standards. The book provides a unique framework for the study of nano-scale science through environmental science, specifically groundwater pollution. Read More

Unbounding the Future: the Nanotechnology Revolution

The science is good, the engineering is feasible, the paths of approach are many, the consequences are revolutionary-times-revolutionary, and the schedule is: in our lifetimes. Read More

Nanotechnology

Manufactured products are made from atoms. The properties of those products depend on how those atoms are arranged. If we rearrange the atoms in coal we can make diamond. If we rearrange the atoms in sand (and add a few other trace elements) we can make computer chips. If we rearrange the atoms in dirt, water and air we can make potatoes. Todays manufacturing methods are very crude at the molecular level. Casting, grinding, milling and even lithography move atoms in great thundering statistical herds. It’s like trying to make things out of LEGO blocks with boxing gloves on your hands. Yes, you can push the LEGO blocks into great heaps and pile them up, but you can’t really snap them together the way you’d like. Read More

Nanowerk Spotlight

Behind the buzz and beyond the hype: Our daily Nanowerk-exclusive nanotechnology feature article. Some stories are more like an introduction to nanotechnology, some are about understanding current developments, and some are advanced reviews of leading edge research. Read More

What is Nanotechnology?

A KQED Multimedia Series Exploring Northern California Science, Environment and Nature. Read More

Nanotechnologies for Water Environment Applications

Library Holdings. Nanotechnologies, “the engine of the next Industrial Revolution,” represent the new wave of research for chemical and industrial innovation. However, with any new technology or compound, comes the threat of harm to humans and natural ecosystems. Research into the environmental effects, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of nanotechnologies and nanoproducts has never been more important. Read More

Health Care: Biosensors

Years from now, a typical doctor visit might not include dull magazines, pharmacy lines, and saying “Ahh.” Instead, a chip implanted in the body will function as a constant on-board doctor, detecting diseases early and delivering drugs straight into the bloodstream. Sound like an Orwellian/Asimov hybrid to be seen in an episode of a Jetsonic future space-age cartoon? Think again. Biosensors could make this scenario a reality before your toddler goes to college. Read More

Breaking Down the Blocks that Build Biosensors

Research and industry are increasingly exploiting the potential of aptamers. As well as their application in research, medical diagnosis and treatment, aptamers are also interesting as a basis for biosensors for use in environmental analysis because their characteristics enable them to identify and bind target molecules as surely as a key fits a lock. In a new book, researchers at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) describe the methods used to obtain aptamers. A newly-approved project aims to develop new nanostructured biosensors to measure harmful substances in water. Read More

Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring Superfund Research Program

This was the first of two seminars on Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring sponsored by the NIEHS Superfund Basic Research Program and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Technology Innovation Program. Dr. Michael Denison and Shirley Gee from the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) presented their work on the development of miniaturized, fast, sensitive bioassay systems for use in environmental research and monitoring at hazardous waste sites. Dr. Ian Kennedy, also from UC Davis, discussed his advances in nanotechnology and the use of MEMs (Micro Electro Mechanical system) fabrication techniques to make a micro-sized instrument for optical detection of trace amounts of chemicals in aqueous solutions. Read More

Biosensors for Environmental Applications: Future Development Trends

Biosensors can be excellent analytical tools for monitoring programs working to implement legislation. In this article, biosensors for environmental analysis and monitoring are extensively reviewed. Examples of biosensors for the most important families of environmental pollutants, including some commercial devices, are presented. Finally, future trends in biosensor development are discussed. In this context, bioelectronics, nanotechnology, miniaturization, and especially biotechnology seem to be growing areas that will have a marked influence on the development of new biosensing strategies in the next future. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu