» Invasive Species

Insect diversity decreases in gardens with non-native plants

Non-native plants reduce the diversity of insect populations in gardens, even where the non-native plants are closely related to the native plants, new research shows. The goal of this research was to understand how the composition of the plants that homeowners plant in their yards affects herbivore communities. Read More

National Invasive Species Information Center (NISIC)

National Invasive Species Information Center (NISIC): Gateway to invasive species information; covering Federal, State, local, and international sources. Invasive species are plants, animals, or pathogens that are non-native (or alien) to the ecosystem under consideration and whose introduction causes or is likely to cause harm. Read More

Linking Local Perceptions to the Biophysical and Amenity Contexts of Forest Disturbance in Colorado

Disturbances by insects have considerable effect on the heterogeneity of forested landscapes in North America. Responding to calls for bringing human dimensions of landscape disturbance and heterogeneity into ecological assessments and management strategies, this paper explores linkages between biophysical, socioeconomic, and perceptual aspects of a mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak in north central Colorado. Findings are presented from surveys conducted with residents of nine Colorado communities and variations in local perceptions of MPB risks and forest management attitudes are compared to indices of tree mortality and amenity characteristics. Findings suggest respondents from lower amenity communities with more recent emphasis on resource extraction and higher tree mortality had significantly higher risk perceptions of some MPB impacts, lower trust in federal forest management, and higher faith in forest industry and specific industry options than those from higher amenity communities with less tree mortality. While not implying these contextual influences fully explain such perceptual dimensions, this paper explores possible implications of heterogeneity across human landscapes for improving the saliency and efficiency of regional forest management and planning. Read More

International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) : message from the President of the United States transmitting International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), adopted at the Conference of the Food

This treaty updates a previous international agreement aimed at promoting international cooperation to control and prevent the spread of harmful plant pests. Read More

Convention for the Protection of Plants : message from the President of the United States transmitting the International Convention for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants of December 2, 1961, a

This treaty takes action to control the introduction and spread of pests of plants and plant products. The treaty protects natural as well as cultivated plants, so it has implications for agriculture as well as biodiversity. While the IPPC’s primary focus is on plants and plant products moving in international trade, the convention also covers research materials, biological control organisms, and anything else that can act as a vector for the spread of plant pests including containers, soil, vehicles, and machinery. Read More

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Action Plan

This action plan articulates the most significant ecosystem problems for the Great Lakes, and describes efforts to address them. The five areas are toxic substances, invasive species, health and pollution, wildlife and habitat preservation and restoration, and finally a component that covers accountability and evaluation. Read More

Online Training in Watershed Management

This Web site offers a variety of self-paced training modules that represent a basic and broad introduction to the watershed management field. Read More

Controlling the Japanese Beetle

Describes the characteristics of the Japanese beetle, the damage it causes to plants, and methods of control. Read More

DIVERSITAS Science Plan

Library Holdings. Biodiversity is the variety of life on Earth. Scientists commonly measure and describe this variety at the level of genes, species and ecosystems, but scientific interest in biodiversity goes far beyond describing and measuring it. The DIVERSITAS programme was founded to address the scientific questions that need to be answered in order to understand how biodiversity supports life on Earth, what the impacts of the present loss of biodiversity are for human and ecosystem survival and how humans can sustainably use and conserve biodiversity. Therefore, this Science Plan is mainly concerned with the current extinction “crisis” on Earth, which, unlike its predecessors, is occurring at an unprecedented rate, is the direct result of human activities and is occurring at all levels at which diversity is measured – from the genetic diversity of many natural and domesticated species to the diversity of ecosystems and landscapes, through the tremendous richness of species. Current human-induced rates of species extinction are estimated to be about 1,000 times greater than past background rates. Read More

Aquatic Invasive Species

Aquatic Invasive Species pose an ever-increasing threat to the health of our Nation’s ecosystems. NOAA’s mission to protect, restore, and manage the use of U.S. ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes resources drives its program to reduce economic and environmental impacts resulting from aquatic invasions. Read More

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EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu