» Climate Change

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is a multi-laboratory, U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) scientific user facility, and a key contributor to national and international research efforts related to global climate change. ARM data are currently collected from three atmospheric observatories—Southern Great Plains, North Slope of Alaska, and Eastern North Atlantic—which represent the broad range of climate conditions around the world, as well as from the three ARM mobile facilities and ARM aerial facilities. Read More

NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory: Global Monitoring Division

ESRL’s Global Monitoring Division conducts sustained observations and research related to global distributions, trends, sources and sinks of atmospheric constituents that are capable of forcing change in the climate of the Earth. This research will advance climate projections and provide scientific policy-relevant, decision support information to enhance society’s ability to plan and respond. Read More

Global Oneness Project

Our stories explore cultural, social and environmental issues with a humanistic lens. Aligned to National and Common Core standards, our lesson plans, available in both English or Spanish, offer an interdisciplinary approach to learning and facilitates the development of active, critical thinking. Read More

Tara Expeditions

Tara expeditions organizes voyages to study and understand the impact of climate change and the ecological crisis facing the world’s oceans. Tara’s scientific expeditions study three main research themes: ocean and mankind, ocean and biodiversity, and ocean and climate. Learn more here. Read More

Arctic Resilience Report Website

The Arctic region is changing rapidly, in ways that could dramatically affect people’s lives and ecosystems. Climate change is a major concern, but rapid economic development and social transformation could also make significant impacts. Some changes may be gradual, but there may also be large and sudden shifts. For those charged with managing natural resources and public policy in the region, it is crucial to identify potential thresholds to prepare effectively for an uncertain future. The Arctic Resilience Report is a science-based assessment that aims to better understand the integrated impacts of change in the Arctic. Its goals are to: • Identify the potential for shocks and large shifts in ecosystems services that affect human well-being in the Arctic. • Analyze how different drivers of change interact in ways that affect the ability of ecosystems and human populations to withstand shocks, adapt or transform. • Evaluate strategies for governments and communities to adapt. The Arctic Resilience Report is led by the Stockholm Environment Institute and the Stockholm Resilience Centre and engages experts from across the Arctic. Read More

How Clean is Your Electric Vehicle

Electric cars tend to produce less carbon pollution than gas-powered ones—but just how much less? Enter your ZIP code below to see how different types of vehicles stack up in your area. Entering a make, model, and year will narrow results to a specific EV model. Read More

How much carbon dioxide is produced when different fuels are burned?

Different fuels emit different amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) in relation to the energy they produce when burned. To analyze emissions across fuels, compare the amount of CO2 emitted per unit of energy output or heat content. Read More

University of Hawaii Sea Level Center

The UHSLC serves multiple roles in support of real-time oceanographic operations as well as climate and oceanographic research. The UHSLC collaborates with agencies within host countries to install and maintain a global network of tide gauge stations that range in utility from tsunami warning to global sea level rise. The growing UHSLC network consists of more than 80 stations. The data are routinely processed, analyzed, and distributed at varying levels of temporal resolution and quality control that fill multiple end-user needs. UHSLC datasets are used for assimilation into operational numerical models, the calibration of satellite altimeter data, the production of oceanographic products, and research on various time-scales from decadal climate fluctuations to short-term extreme events. UHSLC real-time data contribute to the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center and other operational warning agencies. Over the years the UHSLC has participated in national and international research programs including NORPAX, TOGA, WOCE, GODAE and CLIVAR. Read More

Sea Level Rise (NASA)

NASA keeps track of sea level change and its causes from space. Find out more about how NASA satellite observations help our understanding of this complex topic. Read More

Beyond coal: scaling up clean energy to fight global poverty

Eradicating global poverty is within reach, but under threat from a changing climate. Left unchecked, climate change will put at risk our ability to lift people out of extreme poverty permanently by 2030, the first target of the Sustainable Development Goals. Coal is the world’s number one source of CO2 emissions. Most historic emissions came from the coal industry in the developed world in the last century, with China joining the biggest emitters at the beginning of this one. It is widely accepted that a rapid and just response to climate change will require the urgent replacement of coal with low-carbon energy sources in rich economies. Read More

Mission

EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC

EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu