Skip Navigation

the Environmental and Energy Resources Library

Home Browse Resources Get Recommendations Forums About Help Advanced Search

Technology and Environmental Decision-Making: A critical-thinking approach to 7 environmental challenges

ATEEC and MIT teamed up to produce Technology and Environmental Decision-Making: A critical-thinking approach to 7 environmental challenges. This is a series of seven high quality instructional modules developed by researchers and instructional designers. The series, aimed at college and high school instructors, delivers science-based background information and the latest research on a variety of environmental concerns. The modules provide a refresher for the instructor on the scientific background of each environmental issue. Additionally, they promote teaching critical thinking through the inclusion of resources and activities for use in the classroom.

Environmental decision-making—it sounds complicated. It sounds like something that should be left to the experts. And environmental issues can be complicated. But environmental decision-making in a society shares some of the key processes that individuals use to make shared decisions on a daily basis. If we compare the societal decision-making process to that of a family, the issue becomes a much more manageable concept. Picture a typical family problem—a 16- year-old gets his driver’s license and his parents have told him that he will need to pay for his own gas and car insurance. Until now, his weekly allowance from household chores has been adequate for his expenses. He decides to get a part-time job to pay for the extra expense of driving a car, and his parents approve—a fairly straightforward problem, decision, and resolution. More often, however, solutions are not this simple. What may at first seem like a straightforward decision can be affected by variables that complicate the matter considerably. Imagine the same basic problem, this time with added factors. In this family, one parent works second shift and the other parent takes frequent business trips. The 16-year-old boy has the responsibility of watching a 10-year-old sibling most evenings, and a part-time job would require that he work in the evenings. In this instance, there are more people involved in the problem—more stakeholders. The solution in this case is less obvious and will need to respond to the concerns of all stakeholders.

Cumulative Rating: (not yet rated)
Date Of Record Release 2018-07-26 17:49:12
Description ATEEC and MIT teamed up to produce Technology and Environmental Decision-Making: A critical-thinking approach to 7 environmental challenges. This is a series of seven high quality instructional modules developed by researchers and instructional designers. The series, aimed at college and high school instructors, delivers science-based background information and the latest research on a variety of environmental concerns. The modules provide a refresher for the instructor on the scientific background of each environmental issue. Additionally, they promote teaching critical thinking through the inclusion of resources and activities for use in the classroom.

Environmental decision-making—it sounds complicated. It sounds like something that should be left to the experts. And environmental issues can be complicated. But environmental decision-making in a society shares some of the key processes that individuals use to make shared decisions on a daily basis. If we compare the societal decision-making process to that of a family, the issue becomes a much more manageable concept. Picture a typical family problem—a 16- year-old gets his driver’s license and his parents have told him that he will need to pay for his own gas and car insurance. Until now, his weekly allowance from household chores has been adequate for his expenses. He decides to get a part-time job to pay for the extra expense of driving a car, and his parents approve—a fairly straightforward problem, decision, and resolution. More often, however, solutions are not this simple. What may at first seem like a straightforward decision can be affected by variables that complicate the matter considerably. Imagine the same basic problem, this time with added factors. In this family, one parent works second shift and the other parent takes frequent business trips. The 16-year-old boy has the responsibility of watching a 10-year-old sibling most evenings, and a part-time job would require that he work in the evenings. In this instance, there are more people involved in the problem—more stakeholders. The solution in this case is less obvious and will need to respond to the concerns of all stakeholders.
Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Keyword Technology, Environment, Decision-making
Date Of Record Creation 2018-07-26 17:44:28
Education Level
Date Last Modified 2018-07-26 17:49:12
Language English
Date Record Checked: 2018-07-26 17:44:28 (W3C-DTF)

Log In:





Mission
EERL's mission is to be the best possible online collection of environmental and energy sustainability resources for community college educators and for their students. The resources are also available for practitioners and the public.

EERL & ATEEC
EERL is a product of a community college-based National Science Foundation Center, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), and its partners.

Contact ATEEC 563.441.4087 or by email ateec@eicc.edu