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Identifying green energy jobs for individuals with entry-level skills has been a significant problem. In fact, the projections for green growth have not yet translated into a sizable number of jobs. As of now, there also appears to be only marginal demand within green energy sectors for lower-skilled workers. Moreover, green energy sector credentials and competencies are inconsistent and still evolving across the industry and among employers. And though welcome, the large influx of training funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) has also contributed to substantial confusion among training providers struggling to determine who should provide what training. In this paper, Workforce Strategy Center (WSC) examines how community colleges leading the field in green energy education are grappling with these issues. It also makes the case that community colleges should be substantially involved in training low-income individuals, especially the low-skilled, if in fact the goal is to help them lead self-sustaining lives. Our aim is to help community colleges across the country navigate a path forward through evolving terrain as they develop green energy education and training programs for low income populations. Their success will enable national and state policies incentivizing growth in the green economy to propel disadvantaged people towards family-supporting employment.

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Date Of Record Release 2016-03-30 21:21:39
Description Identifying green energy jobs for individuals with entry-level skills has been a significant problem. In fact, the projections for green growth have not yet translated into a sizable number of jobs. As of now, there also appears to be only marginal demand within green energy sectors for lower-skilled workers. Moreover, green energy sector credentials and competencies are inconsistent and still evolving across the industry and among employers. And though welcome, the large influx of training funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) has also contributed to substantial confusion among training providers struggling to determine who should provide what training. In this paper, Workforce Strategy Center (WSC) examines how community colleges leading the field in green energy education are grappling with these issues. It also makes the case that community colleges should be substantially involved in training low-income individuals, especially the low-skilled, if in fact the goal is to help them lead self-sustaining lives. Our aim is to help community colleges across the country navigate a path forward through evolving terrain as they develop green energy education and training programs for low income populations. Their success will enable national and state policies incentivizing growth in the green economy to propel disadvantaged people towards family-supporting employment.
Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Keyword Green Jobs, Community Colleges, Workforce Development
Date Of Record Creation 2016-03-30 21:17:50
Education Level
Date Last Modified 2016-03-30 21:21:39
Language English
Date Record Checked: 2016-03-30 21:17:50 (W3C-DTF)

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