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Exergy Analysis Of A Low Temperature Radiant Heating System

An eight-page paper on a study to gain insight into the process of heating a room with a low-temperature radiant heating system and solar energy, considering energy conversion and heat transfer steps in the building (where heat is required), in the incident solar radiation (which supplies part of the heat required) and in the heating system (which provides for the additional heating needs, by using electricity from a gas-fired power plant to drive a heat pump). We applied a theoretical framework developed by Shukuya, et. al. to a dynamic simulation model and did numerical calculations for a room with an exterior wall, with and without a south-facing window, during a heating season in the Netherlands. The energy analysis allows direct comparison between different energy types (e.g. heat, electricity, fuel) on a common basis, and the concept of energy consumption is useful for expressing how and where energy is dispersed in the course of energy conversion and heat transfer steps. The results show that energy consumption in the room (demand side) is relatively small compared to the supply side (fuel burned at the power plant and the sun reaching the ground and facade). The calculations also show that the total amount of energy consumed during the heating season can be larger than the total amount of energy supplied during the same period, as a result of heat storage in the building mass, and of changes in the outdoor temperature between the moment of heat storage and heat release. “Exergy” is what chemists call Free Energy (Gibbs G = H – TS or Helmholtz A = U – TS).

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Date Of Record Release 2010-11-11 20:06:44
Description An eight-page paper on a study to gain insight into the process of heating a room with a low-temperature radiant heating system and solar energy, considering energy conversion and heat transfer steps in the building (where heat is required), in the incident solar radiation (which supplies part of the heat required) and in the heating system (which provides for the additional heating needs, by using electricity from a gas-fired power plant to drive a heat pump). We applied a theoretical framework developed by Shukuya, et. al. to a dynamic simulation model and did numerical calculations for a room with an exterior wall, with and without a south-facing window, during a heating season in the Netherlands. The energy analysis allows direct comparison between different energy types (e.g. heat, electricity, fuel) on a common basis, and the concept of energy consumption is useful for expressing how and where energy is dispersed in the course of energy conversion and heat transfer steps. The results show that energy consumption in the room (demand side) is relatively small compared to the supply side (fuel burned at the power plant and the sun reaching the ground and facade). The calculations also show that the total amount of energy consumed during the heating season can be larger than the total amount of energy supplied during the same period, as a result of heat storage in the building mass, and of changes in the outdoor temperature between the moment of heat storage and heat release. “Exergy” is what chemists call Free Energy (Gibbs G = H – TS or Helmholtz A = U – TS).
Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Keyword Eighth International IBPSA Conference, Heat pump
Selector Selection Committee
Date Of Record Creation 2010-11-11 19:50:13
Education Level
Date Last Modified 2010-11-11 20:06:44
Creator Asada, H. & Boelman, E.C.
Language English
Date Record Checked: 2010-11-11 00:00:00 (W3C-DTF)

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