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Principles of Sustainable Weed Management for Croplands

To some extent, weeds are a result of crop production, but to a larger extent they are a consequence of
management decisions. Managing croplands according to nature’s principles will reduce weed problems. And while these principles apply to most crops, this publication focuses on agronomic crops such as corn, soybeans, milo, and small grains. The opportunities to address the root causes of weeds are not always readily apparent, and often require
some imagination to recognize. Creativity is key to taking advantage of these opportunities and devising sustainable cropping systems that prevent weed problems, rather than using quick-fix approaches. Annual monoculture crop production generally involves tillage that creates conditions hospitable to many weeds. This publication discusses several alternatives to conventional tillage systems, including allelopathy, intercropping, crop rotations, and a weedfree cropping design. A Resources list provides sources of further information.

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Date Of Record Release 2010-01-18 15:04:06
Description To some extent, weeds are a result of crop production, but to a larger extent they are a consequence of
management decisions. Managing croplands according to nature’s principles will reduce weed problems. And while these principles apply to most crops, this publication focuses on agronomic crops such as corn, soybeans, milo, and small grains. The opportunities to address the root causes of weeds are not always readily apparent, and often require
some imagination to recognize. Creativity is key to taking advantage of these opportunities and devising sustainable cropping systems that prevent weed problems, rather than using quick-fix approaches. Annual monoculture crop production generally involves tillage that creates conditions hospitable to many weeds. This publication discusses several alternatives to conventional tillage systems, including allelopathy, intercropping, crop rotations, and a weedfree cropping design. A Resources list provides sources of further information.
Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Source National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service (ATTRA)
Keyword Weeds, Croplands, Farming
Selector Bates
Date Of Record Creation 2010-01-18 14:57:18
Education Level
Date Last Modified 2010-01-18 15:04:07
Creator Preston Sullivan
Language English
Date Record Checked: 2010-01-18 00:00:00 (W3C-DTF)

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