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DNA Fingerprinting: Bubble Gum Mystery: Teacher Guide

Teacher guide. This teacher guide is provided to give sample answers to questions. Most of the questions are open-ended, so students may have correct answers that aren't included in this guide. Finally, although the experiment is set up to yield one correct answer, there are variations in data between students. As long as students examine their data carefully and can justify their answers based on their data, that's science! Data are always right and there isn't necessarily a 'right answer'. You can use whatever crime scene you would like to set up. The gum scenario is designed to show a match of DNA fragments for one of the suspects and the crime scene (unless we have ABC gum…) You also have the option of having the DNA from the crime scene a mixture of the victim and a suspect (i.e. the cat food caper.) The match is much easier to read, and I prefer to save the mix for a paternity case such as the whale paternity activity. However you can make up any scenario that you wish, just be certain that the DNA you have makes sense for your scenario.

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Date Of Record Release 2009-10-12 16:45:01
Description Teacher guide. This teacher guide is provided to give sample answers to questions. Most of the questions are open-ended, so students may have correct answers that aren't included in this guide. Finally, although the experiment is set up to yield one correct answer, there are variations in data between students. As long as students examine their data carefully and can justify their answers based on their data, that's science! Data are always right and there isn't necessarily a 'right answer'. You can use whatever crime scene you would like to set up. The gum scenario is designed to show a match of DNA fragments for one of the suspects and the crime scene (unless we have ABC gum…) You also have the option of having the DNA from the crime scene a mixture of the victim and a suspect (i.e. the cat food caper.) The match is much easier to read, and I prefer to save the mix for a paternity case such as the whale paternity activity. However you can make up any scenario that you wish, just be certain that the DNA you have makes sense for your scenario.
Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Source Biotechnology Project
Keyword Teacher's guide, DNA
Selector Stith
Date Of Record Creation 2009-10-12 16:40:19
Education Level
Date Last Modified 2009-10-12 16:50:06
Language English
Date Record Checked: 2009-10-12 00:00:00 (W3C-DTF)

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