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Evolving Issues and Practices in Managing Ground-Water Resources: Case Studies on the Role of Science

Hydrologic stresses throughout the 20th century and presently (2003) have caused the depletion and degradation of our Nation’s vital ground-water resources in many areas. Management strategies have been and are being implemented to optimize use of our ground-water resources with respect to achieving sustainability while mitigating the consequences of future withdrawals. The seven case studies presented herein show how the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with local, State and other Federal agencies, as well as the private sector, have addressed some of the complexities of ground-water management using scientifically-based hydrologic studies and hydrologic monitoring. It is clear that the managed conjunctive use of our combined ground-water and surface-water supplies, and the artificial recharge of our ground-water systems present both challenges and opportunities. How well we manage these options depends upon best science practices, improved understanding of the resources, and the informed consensus of all stakeholders.

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Date Of Record Release 2009-09-22 14:52:43
Description Hydrologic stresses throughout the 20th century and presently (2003) have caused the depletion and degradation of our Nation’s vital ground-water resources in many areas. Management strategies have been and are being implemented to optimize use of our ground-water resources with respect to achieving sustainability while mitigating the consequences of future withdrawals. The seven case studies presented herein show how the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with local, State and other Federal agencies, as well as the private sector, have addressed some of the complexities of ground-water management using scientifically-based hydrologic studies and hydrologic monitoring. It is clear that the managed conjunctive use of our combined ground-water and surface-water supplies, and the artificial recharge of our ground-water systems present both challenges and opportunities. How well we manage these options depends upon best science practices, improved understanding of the resources, and the informed consensus of all stakeholders.
Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Keyword Groundwater, Hydrology
Selector Bates
Date Of Record Creation 2009-09-22 14:47:58
Education Level
Date Last Modified 2009-09-22 14:52:43
Creator Devin L. Galloway, William M. Alley, Paul M. Barlow, Thomas E. Reilly, Patrick Tucci
Language English
Date Record Checked: 2009-09-22 00:00:00 (W3C-DTF)

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