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Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability: Real-Time Modeling Airborne Hazardous Materials

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Liverrnore National Laboratory is a centralized federal project for assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous materials in real time. Since ARAC began making assessments in 1974, the project has responded to over 60 domestic and international incidents. ARAC can model radiological accidents in the United States within 30 to 90 rein, using itsoperationally robust, three-dimensional atmospheric transport and dispersion models, extensive geophysical and dose-factor databases, meteorological data acquisition systems, and experienced staff. Although it was originally conceived and developed as an emergency response and assessment service for providing dose-assessment calculations after nuclear accidents,
it has proven to be an extremely adaptable system, capable of being
modified to respond also to nonradiological hazardous releases. In
1991, ARAC responded to three major events: the oil fires in Kuwait,
the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines, and an herbicide spill
into the upper Sacramento River in California. Modeling the atmospheric
effects of these events added significantly to the range of
pmblemsthat ARAC can address and demonstrated that the system
can be adapted to assess and respond to concurrent, multiple, unrelated events at dtierent locations.

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Date Of Record Release 2009-06-15 14:12:53
Description The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Liverrnore National Laboratory is a centralized federal project for assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous materials in real time. Since ARAC began making assessments in 1974, the project has responded to over 60 domestic and international incidents. ARAC can model radiological accidents in the United States within 30 to 90 rein, using itsoperationally robust, three-dimensional atmospheric transport and dispersion models, extensive geophysical and dose-factor databases, meteorological data acquisition systems, and experienced staff. Although it was originally conceived and developed as an emergency response and assessment service for providing dose-assessment calculations after nuclear accidents,
it has proven to be an extremely adaptable system, capable of being
modified to respond also to nonradiological hazardous releases. In
1991, ARAC responded to three major events: the oil fires in Kuwait,
the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines, and an herbicide spill
into the upper Sacramento River in California. Modeling the atmospheric
effects of these events added significantly to the range of
pmblemsthat ARAC can address and demonstrated that the system
can be adapted to assess and respond to concurrent, multiple, unrelated events at dtierent locations.
Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Source National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center
Keyword Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), Assessment, Atmospheric releases, Hazardous materials, Radiological accidents, 3-D, Atmospheric transport and dispersion models, Databases, Meteorological data acquisition, emergency response, Nuclear accidents, Oil fires, Volcano eruptions
Selector Stith
Date Of Record Creation 2009-06-15 14:00:59
Education Level
Date Last Modified 2010-04-09 17:07:22
Creator Thomas J. Sullivan,* James S. Ellis, Connee S. Foster, Kevin T. Foster, Ronald L. Baskett, John S. N
Language English
Date Record Checked: 2009-06-15 00:00:00 (W3C-DTF)

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