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‘Decomposer’ Basidiomycota in Arctic and Antarctic Ecosystems

Current knowledge concerning ‘decomposer’ Basidiomycota in Arctic and Antarctic ecosystems is based on two sources: (a) collections and surveys of basidiomata, which have resulted in high-quality catalogues of species, although much of the species’ distribution and ecology are tentative and (b) isolations from soils and plant litter which typically result in a “low incidence of basidiomycetes” [Dowding, P., Widden, P., 1974. Some relations between fungi and their environment in tundra regions. In: Holding, A.J., Heal, O.W., MacLean Jr., S.F., Flanagan, P.W. (Eds.), Soil Organisms and Decomposition in Tundra. Tundra Biome Steering Committee, Stockholm, Sweden, pp. 123–150], probably because of selectivity in isolation methods. In the few molecular studies carried out in Arctic and Antarctic soils to date, basidiomycetes, particularly yeasts, have been found. These techniques should give better estimates of the order of magnitude of fungal species richness in Arctic and Antarctic soils, although caution should be used concerning primer choice and amplification conditions. From collections in Arctic regions, species of basidiomycetes appear to be circumpolar in distribution with restricted endemism. Using culture-independent methods, it should be possible to test whether selected Arctic or Antarctic species are truly cosmopolitan, circumpolar, endemic, or are cryptic phylogenetic species.

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Date Of Record Release 2009-03-19 16:15:25
Description Current knowledge concerning ‘decomposer’ Basidiomycota in Arctic and Antarctic ecosystems is based on two sources: (a) collections and surveys of basidiomata, which have resulted in high-quality catalogues of species, although much of the species’ distribution and ecology are tentative and (b) isolations from soils and plant litter which typically result in a “low incidence of basidiomycetes” [Dowding, P., Widden, P., 1974. Some relations between fungi and their environment in tundra regions. In: Holding, A.J., Heal, O.W., MacLean Jr., S.F., Flanagan, P.W. (Eds.), Soil Organisms and Decomposition in Tundra. Tundra Biome Steering Committee, Stockholm, Sweden, pp. 123–150], probably because of selectivity in isolation methods. In the few molecular studies carried out in Arctic and Antarctic soils to date, basidiomycetes, particularly yeasts, have been found. These techniques should give better estimates of the order of magnitude of fungal species richness in Arctic and Antarctic soils, although caution should be used concerning primer choice and amplification conditions. From collections in Arctic regions, species of basidiomycetes appear to be circumpolar in distribution with restricted endemism. Using culture-independent methods, it should be possible to test whether selected Arctic or Antarctic species are truly cosmopolitan, circumpolar, endemic, or are cryptic phylogenetic species.
Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Source Science Direct
Keyword Arctic, Antarctic, Ecosystem, Ecosystems, Basidiomata, Basidimycota,
Date Of Record Creation 2009-03-19 16:11:38
Education Level
Date Last Modified 2010-05-07 13:31:54
Creator Katherine E. Ludley. Clare H. Robinson
Language English
Date Record Checked: 2009-03-19 00:00:00 (W3C-DTF)

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