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Global Climate Change – Microbial Communities as a Diagnostic Tool?

Scientists and reef managers are concerned about coral reef systems being affected by global change and need to understand the processes that control their resilience. This large, integrated project involves collaboration between the USGS, the University of Hawaii, the Florida Institute of Technology, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the National Park Service. Studies are underway in the National Park of American Samoa to determine the internal and external factors that increase the ability of a wide variety of corals to resist environmental stress. The shallow lagoon there contains species of Acropora and Pocillopora, corals ordinarily prone to bleaching (expelling their symbionts) at high temperatures. External factors include changes in water temperature, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, dissolved oxygen, and water motion. Internal factors being investigated include genetic diversity of algal symbionts and the associated microbial communities. Because changes in the coral-associated bacterial communities echo changes in the health of the coral, bacteria are at minimum atuned to their host's metabolism and may play an active role in maintaining the overall health of the coral.

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Date Of Record Release 2009-02-16 17:35:11
Description Scientists and reef managers are concerned about coral reef systems being affected by global change and need to understand the processes that control their resilience. This large, integrated project involves collaboration between the USGS, the University of Hawaii, the Florida Institute of Technology, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the National Park Service. Studies are underway in the National Park of American Samoa to determine the internal and external factors that increase the ability of a wide variety of corals to resist environmental stress. The shallow lagoon there contains species of Acropora and Pocillopora, corals ordinarily prone to bleaching (expelling their symbionts) at high temperatures. External factors include changes in water temperature, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, dissolved oxygen, and water motion. Internal factors being investigated include genetic diversity of algal symbionts and the associated microbial communities. Because changes in the coral-associated bacterial communities echo changes in the health of the coral, bacteria are at minimum atuned to their host's metabolism and may play an active role in maintaining the overall health of the coral.
Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Source United States Geological Survey
Selector Bates
Date Of Record Creation 2009-02-16 17:32:39
Education Level
Date Last Modified 2010-10-14 14:18:07
Creator Christina Kellogg, Virginia Garrison, John Lisle
Language English
Date Record Checked: 2009-02-15 00:00:00 (W3C-DTF)

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