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Native American Virtual Reality Archaeology: An Architect's Perspective

Pre-Columbian Native American architecture of the Southwest U.S., specifically that of the so-called "Anasazi People", has always fascinated me. When my architecture practice brought me to work in New Mexico in 1990, I was amazed to find the extent of the presence of this native architecture in the high desert landscape. Ceramics, lithics, and mounds of collapsed village and compound walls can be seen on terraces wherever there is nearby flowing water and bottom land. While most visible traces of pre-historic native architecture have been destroyed in the rest of the U.S. , due primarily to Eurocentric agricultural practices and urbanization, the American Southwest still displays an extraordinarily large number of sites, many of which have yet to be studied in depth by archaeologists.

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Date Of Record Release 2009-01-13 18:39:44
Description Pre-Columbian Native American architecture of the Southwest U.S., specifically that of the so-called "Anasazi People", has always fascinated me. When my architecture practice brought me to work in New Mexico in 1990, I was amazed to find the extent of the presence of this native architecture in the high desert landscape. Ceramics, lithics, and mounds of collapsed village and compound walls can be seen on terraces wherever there is nearby flowing water and bottom land. While most visible traces of pre-historic native architecture have been destroyed in the rest of the U.S. , due primarily to Eurocentric agricultural practices and urbanization, the American Southwest still displays an extraordinarily large number of sites, many of which have yet to be studied in depth by archaeologists.
Classification
Resource Type
Format
Subject
Source Dennis Holloway: an Architect in Northern New Mexico
Keyword Pre-Columbian Era, Native Americans, Native American structures
Selector Offley
Date Of Record Creation 2009-01-13 18:33:59
Education Level
Date Last Modified 2010-01-19 18:51:03
Language English
Date Record Checked: 2009-01-13 00:00:00 (W3C-DTF)

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