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Energy -- Energy Sources - Wind -- Bat wind turbine strikes

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View Resource Ecological Impacts of Wind Energy Development on Bats: Questions, Research Needs, and Hypotheses

At a time of growing concern over the rising costs and long-term environmental impacts of the use of fossil fuels and nuclear energy, wind energy has become an increasingly important sector of the...

http://dropthelines.com/downloads/Kunz.Bats_&_Wind.07.pdf
View Resource Impacts of Wind Energy Development on Wildlife: Key Issues of Concern

This is a more balanced document. It presents a way for wind and wildlife to coexist with some compromises from both the industry and the wildlife advocates. It is a good resource for the collection.

http://www.vawind.org/Assets/Docs/Key%20Issues%2001-06-06.pd...
View Resource Interim Guidelines to Avoid and Minimize Wildlife Impacts from Wind Turbines

Wind energy facilities can adversely impact wildlife, especially birds and bats, and their habitats. As more facilities with larger turbines are built, the cumulative effects of this rapidly growing...

http://www.fws.gov/habitatconservation/Service%20Interim%20G...
View Resource Operational Mitigation & Deterrents

Patterns of bat fatality, relationships between weather and turbine variables, and observations with thermal imaging all corroborate and suggest bat fatalities occur primarily on low wind nights, but...

http://www.batsandwind.org/main.asp?page=research&sub=operat...
View Resource When Blade Meets Bat: Unexpected Bat Kills Threaten Future Wind Farms

The interaction of bats and wind turbines is emerging as a major and unexpected problem in northern Appalachia. From mid-August through October 2003, during the fall migration period, at least 400...

http://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/m/r/mrg5/Sciamer2-04.pdf
View Resource Wind Energy and Wildlife

Wind, a 100% clean energy source, is one of the healthiest energy options, and one of the most compatible with animals and humans. While birds do collide with wind turbines at some sites, modern...

http://www.awea.org/_cs_upload/learnabout/publications/4139_...
View Resource Wind Energy-related Wildlife Impacts: Analysis and Potential Implications for Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species of Birds and Bats in Texas

Texas currently maintains the highest installed nameplate capacity and does not require publicly available post-construction monitoring studies that examine the impacts of wind energy production on...

http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc30459/
View Resource Wind Power: Impacts on Wildlife and Government Responsibilities for Regulating Development and Protecting Wildlife

Wind power has recently experienced dramatic growth in the United States, with further growth expected. However, several wind power-generating facilities have killed migratory birds and bats,...

http://www.batsandwind.org/pdf/gaoreport2005.pdf
View Resource Wind Turbine Guidelines Advisory Committee

On October 24, 2007, Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne announced the appointment of 22 individuals as members of the Wind Turbine Guidelines Advisory Committee. The Committee was formed and...

http://www.fws.gov/habitatconservation/windpower/wind_turbin...
View Resource Wind Turbines Give Bats the "Bends," Study Finds

Wind turbines can kill bats without touching them by causing a bends-like condition due to rapidly dropping air pressure, new research suggests.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/08/080825-bat-b...
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